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It appears I will be going to Afghanistain for a year. What is the best way to store my Z? I have a cover, a garage to keep it in and a battery tender. What about gasoline, tires etc. Any advice would be helpful.
 

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Leave it with me and I will take care of it!!



Ok, really though, you should put the car on jack stands to prevent flatspotting of the tires. Remove the battery completley.

I don't know what to say about the gas though.
 

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HLN A55 said:
Leave it with me and I will take care of it!!



Ok, really though, you should put the car on jack stands to prevent flatspotting of the tires. Remove the battery completley.

I don't know what to say about the gas though.
Add gasoline stabilizer to a full tank.
 

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Here's are some Idea's. Do a search on storing (top right of the page). You will get lots of info.


Washed and wax the exterior. Cleaned the interior.

Changed the oil immediately prior to storing her.

Filled the gas tank and added an appropriate amount of fuel stabilizer (Stabil)

Over inflated the tires to avoid flat spotting. I also placed the tires on thick carpeting.

Added silica packs to the interior to avoid moisture/mildew.

Attached a battery charger (4 stage 'float' charger) to maintain the battery.

Covered all inlets (air, tailpipes, etc) as well as any opening I can find to prevent any critters from making my Z their summer cottage. Also added mothballs in the engine compartment, on and around the tires, and around the vehicle for the same reason (critters).

Cover with a good Car cover.
 

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i have plenty of garage space... and a cover.. and a charger..
will take good care of it for you..

seriously..
 

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IT L GO said:
Here's are some Idea's. Do a search on storing (top right of the page). You will get lots of info.


Washed and wax the exterior. Cleaned the interior.

Changed the oil immediately prior to storing her.

Filled the gas tank and added an appropriate amount of fuel stabilizer (Stabil)

Over inflated the tires to avoid flat spotting. I also placed the tires on thick carpeting.

Added silica packs to the interior to avoid moisture/mildew.

Attached a battery charger (4 stage 'float' charger) to maintain the battery.

Covered all inlets (air, tailpipes, etc) as well as any opening I can find to prevent any critters from making my Z their summer cottage. Also added mothballs in the engine compartment, on and around the tires, and around the vehicle for the same reason (critters).

Cover with a good Car cover.

I agree with all except I'd put her up on Jack-Stands.
Best of Luck to you!
 

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I can vouch for WVphoto (Mike)

he lives an hour south of me in WV, awsome guy, true car nut-I never can keep track of what he's driving next, but the corvettes are a constant (Z06 and his '61 vette). He would make sure your baby is tucked away safe:thumb:
 

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Fuel stabilizer is good for a year. I would not jackstand either. For that long I would buy a set of Tire Cradles. Do a search on Google you'll find what I'm talking about.
 

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wagssd said:
It appears I will be going to Afghanistain for a year. What is the best way to store my Z? I have a cover, a garage to keep it in and a battery tender. What about gasoline, tires etc. Any advice would be helpful.
Been there, done that and got the T shirt. I just got back in April, I went with the 25th ID. The army stored my car with Pascha a private contractor, they kept my 02 Z in a tent out of the sunlight and they started and moved it once a month, to prevent the tires from getting flat spots. They also threw in some dehumidifier packets in the car and checked the fluids periodically, they did add some power steering fluid at one point.

When I picked the car up I didnt know what to expect, but the care was excellent. I did have a dead battery though, which is understandable given the conditions of the charging system.

What unit you with? Im out now, and in Nor Cal.
 

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Thank You eviLS6. By the way it is good to know the government still cares for the troops. Had mt first bike shipped back by Navy from Yokodo Japan in 66.

GASH EB 02
 

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sorry cant help you bro.

just want to say good luck and know everyone appreciates what you guys are doing.


god bless all of you guys going overseas. :usa:
 

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Put some heavy plastic on the ground as a moisture barrier. Based on what I've read, tires lose about 1/2 pound air per month. If you over inflate your tires about 10 lbs. and use the gizmo that prevents flat spots, you should be okay rather than let the tires hang on the a jacked suspension. You may want to also spray the suspension with WD40. Also, a tire cover, like the ones motor homes use, might help keep the tire rubber in good shape.

Thank you for serving our country. Keep safe. We all look forward to your return.
Stumbo



Below are 3 sets of storage tips that might be of interest.

10 Tips for Long-Term Classic Car Storage
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Make sure your gas tank is full. This will reduce the amount of water that can be absorbed by the gasoline and it also slows the rate at which it turns to varnish. Use and additive like "Sta-Bil", "Dry Gas" or similar. Make sure it's well mixed and run the car for a while to make sure it's in the entire fuel system.


Freezing temperatures naturally dictate that anti-freeze be used. But even if it's not freezing, put it in. Many of the newer 'coolants' have excellent corrosion inhibitors that will help protect and lubricate your cooling system. A 50/50 anti-freeze/water mix is fine. Again make sure to run the car so it's mixed throughout the entire system.


Change the engine oil. Dirty oil is contaminated with acids and water that can cause premature bearing failure and rust inside the engine. If the car is likely to be left for a very long period of time unattended, remove the sparkplugs and liberally squirt some form of 'upper-cylinder lubricant' into the cylinders before replacing the plugs. This will help stop the piston rings from rusting to the cylinder walls.


Make sure the Brake and Clutch master cylinders are full of brake fluid. Brake fluid can absorb water very quickly. By reducing the exposed surface area of the fluid, the water absorption can be reduced. If you can, bleed the brake and clutch systems. It is recommended that you do this on an annual basis anyway, to purge the system of old and possibly contaminated brake fluid.


To inhibit rust in the engine area, use a lubricant spray such as WD40 to coat all exposed metal surfaces. The volatile carrier in the WD40 will soon evaporate leaving a protective film on the hose clamps, coils, carb bodies etc. 'Wax-oyl' is also good, but you'll want to hose it off at a 'car wash' in the Spring.


Wash the entire car and apply a good wax. Don't forget to clean the inside. Do this early in the day to give it plenty of time to thoroughly dry before putting it in storage.


If you have a convertible top, leave it up and the windows and vents closed. A convertible top can develop nasty creases when folded for long periods, especially in cold climates. Treat Vinyl tops with Silicone or similar. Keeping the windows and vents closed keeps small creatures from entering. But buy some desiccant sacs from a storage supply house 'Dry Pac' for example and place them inside the car on the floors. This will keep moisture from damaging the interior if it is damp or humid where you are.


Ensure that the boot is clean and dry, The boot seal is not always positive and some moisture can collect and condense in the inner fenders and floor. Air it out well for a day or so, then place a desiccant sac in here too before closing it up.


Finally, take the car on a good 30 minute run. This will evaporate all the moisture in the exhaust and in the engine. Then park the car with the hand brake off and either 'chock' the wheels or leave it in gear if necessary. Over inflating the tires can help guard against flat spots. Disconnect the battery.


The best thing to do for a stored car is to visit it once a month and take it for a short drive. This keeps everything in good shape, preventing things from getting corroded and seals drying out. At the very least have some one start it up periodically. If you are going to cover it use a proper Cloth car cover, not a Plastic one. If you find the concrete floor in your storage unit gets damp or 'sweats' use cat litter, or lay plastic beneath the car to prevent the condensation from reaching your floor pans.



12 Tips for Storing Vehicles
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All kinds of vehicles get stored for the winter, ranging from a convertible that's reserved for sunny days to a car or truck that's left behind when snowbirds head south. "Because cars and trucks were made to be driven regularly, winter storage — or any prolonged period of storage—can really take its toll, unless people take a few precautions to protect their vehicle while it's in hibernation," says Sue Elliott-Sink, director of content for enjoythedrive.com." A little work now can protect a vehicle from rust, animals and other storage-related headaches." To help car and truck owners keep their stored vehicles in good shape, here are a few storage tips.



Get it out of the elements! No amount of precautions will protect a car that is stored outside where the sun, rain, or snow will beat on it day in and day out. Put it under a canopy or keep it in the garage.


Keep the fuel fresh. When gasoline sits, it can break down and form gum and varnish, which will clog a fuel system. What's more, any moisture left in the system can cause rust. The solution: Add a container of fuel stabilizer to the gas tank, then fill the tank to the top right before putting the vehicle into storage. The short drive home from the gas station will circulate the stabilized fuel throughout the system, keeping the gas fresh and the system safe until the vehicle is ready to ride again.


Don't let the cooling system freeze during the winter. Drain the system (including the radiator) and refill it with a rust-inhibiting antifreeze.


Change the oil. It's important to remove any acid, moisture and other contaminants from an engine by changing the oil and filter before putting a vehicle to sleep for the winter. It's okay to use the same-viscosity oil as usual, as long as the oil contains corrosion protection.


Avoid flat-spotting the tires. A vehicle that sits for a long period of time can ruin a set of radial tires. The best way to save those expensive tires is to store the vehicle up on jack stands. Some people also may want to remove the vehicle's wheels and tires—or let some air out of the tires to reduce strain on the shocks and other suspension components.


Keep the battery alive. When a battery loses its charge over time, it can freeze and explode. To avoid a dangerous mess, hook up a battery charger/maintainer, which will keep the battery properly charged, no matter how long the vehicle sits.


Protect the paint. Give the vehicle a good washing before it's put away for the winter to remove any road salt or grunge, and be sure to dry it thoroughly, too. Then apply a protective coat of wax. Finally, slip on a breathable cloth car cover. (Plastic covers will trap condensation and provide a fertile breeding ground for rust.)


Check the insurance. Just because a vehicle is sitting undriven doesn't mean liability coverage is unnecessary. What if someone pushes the car, and it winds up rolling down the driveway and into the neighbor's brand-new Mercedes? Collision and theft coverage can be important, too.


Prevent rust. Unpainted metal surfaces, from engine parts to tailpipes, can use a good coat of rust inhibitor.


Protect vinyl, leather and rubber. If the vehicle will be stored in a dry climate, it's wise to apply a preservative to prevent seats, armrests and dash pads from cracking.


Provide critter protection. All kinds of small animals find vehicle wiring, seats and carpet delectable, and they think cars and trucks make a nice den, too. To keep critters out, place mothballs inside a vehicle, including under the dash, and cover the tailpipe. Or, for total protection, store the vehicle inside a cocoon that seals it completely from the elements.


Store convertibles with the top up. Convertible tops can actually shrink if they are left in the down position for an extended period



Basics of long-term storage
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1. Vehicles are always better off being driven on a regular basis.
2. If you must store, store indoors where the wind can't get to your car.
3. Car covers are ONLY for indoors use out of the wind, no matter what they advertise!
4. It is better to let a car sit for months than to run it once a week for a few minutes. The reason is that you can't get the engine and other drivetrain parts warmed up enough to do any good and you will create condensation in the crankcase and exhaust that will help kill your car.
5. Give your car a bath and good coat of wax including chrome trim before storage. Use a product like Wurth Rubber care on the seals/rubber trim, and Vinylex on tires.
6. Clean the interior, use Lexol on the leather and Vinylex on the vinyl before storage. No need to go overboard and leave it dripping, just a normal treatment.
7. A pan of charcoal bricks (not the type with fuel in them though!) in a pie tin on newspaper inside the car will help soak up odors. Leave windows cracked just a little to let some air circulate and let window seals relax so they seal better in the spring.
8. Remove important papers from the car/glove box. Try to leave the HVAC system in OFF mode to help keep critters out.
9. Give the car a good run and get it fully warmed up right before storage.
10. Fresh fluids at this point are a good idea. Oil and filter, anti-freeze, power steering fluid, tranny fluid and brake fluid should all be changed right before storage. A week or two before storage is OK except the oil, make that as fresh as possible.
11. Once the car is parked where it will sit, remove the battery, store in a cool dry place and trickle charge it once a month. Be sure to check the water level and fill if necessary.
UPDATE: Someone reminded me that a modern trickle charger is a must have item for people that store vehicles for any period of time. In fact I have 6 Battery Tender Juniors on various old cars, and farm/lawn vehicles at my place. Since using them, dead batteries are a thing of the past and my batteries are lasting longer. Modern trickle chargers won't cause acid to boil away like a full fledged charger, but you should still check fluid every month just to be sure. We hope to carry a battery charger for this purpose in the near future.
12. Fill the gas tank before storing with fresh quality fuel. If you drive your car so little that last years gas is still mostly in the tank, then siphon it off and use it in the lawn mower or dispose of properly! Fresh gas will last a full year if kept at a fairly stable temperature below 80 degrees. Filling the tank helps prevent condensation which helps rust tanks and fuel systems. Fuel additives for storage are not needed if storing for less than a year.
13. With carburetor equipped cars, it sometimes helps to disconnect the fuel pump (plug the line so it doesn't drain) and run the car till the carb is dry. BUT, I have stored cars for many years without draining the carbs, and taken the carbs apart and found no deposits or "varnish" in the fuel bowls. Fuel will evaporate out of the carbs within a week anyway. On fuel injected cars, there is no bowl as such so don't worry about it.
14. Do NOT put your car on jack stands or blocks under the frame. This lets the suspension droop and puts the springs and bushings in an unnatural state. If you want to prevent flat spots on tires (not a problem with modern radials anyway) support the car at the outermost points of the suspension so the springs and shocks/struts are in a natural state. Be sure to keep tires (remember the spare) at the correct air pressure and try to keep them away from electric motors or high heat.
UPDATE: Bill Wright, a reader of these pages offers this from his experience: (NOTE: I have never had the dry rot that Bill mentions, when storing on a dry floor, but DRY is the key there. A good way to insulate a concrete or even dirt/gravel floor for better storage is to put down one or two layers of thick plastic sheeting under a layer of old carpet. The carpet won't blow around if the wind gets in when the door is open, and the plastic keeps moisture from coming up and rusting the underside of your vehicle, still, read what Bill has to say:

Much as I get "ridiculed" by friends, I always park all our seldom used vehicles with 1x10s (or 1x8s or 1x12s - whatever fills the bill) under the tires. In my mind, it keeps the tire tread surface (and surrounding area of the sidewalls) away from the concrete - and the moisture-absorbing characteristics of the concrete. (I suppose this would be less of an issue if I had a sealed/epoxy-coated floor in our storage building). I've left old/scrap tires sitting over in a corner of the building in the past and, after a period of time, discovered the portion of the tires closest to the floor became dry-rotted/cracked. I know they weren't this way prior to "going to the corner". Anyways, I have yet to experience any dry-rotting of tires, even some that have sat for years, after storing tires with wood under them. Seems to work fine for me!!

1. It's a good idea to put mouse bait/traps out in any garage. If you don't they will get under your car cover or sheets and make nests (usually near the base of the windshield), you will see their little pee spots on your hood! Left to run amok, mice can build nests in air intakes (seal them off with bags if you can get to them, and check airboxes/air cleaners before first starting), and even in the glove box or inside the seats.
2. When starting the vehicle back up after storage, remove all your covers, bags over pipes, intakes, pans of charcoal, put the freshly charged battery back in and check all fluid levels. If possible disable the ignition (or just don't set the choke on carb equipped cars) and let the engine crank to build oil pressure. I like the idea of a few cranks at slow speed with no oil pressure rather than the first few cranks at 3000 rpm with no oil pressure! Try to get the engine to a slow idle as soon as possible till things warm up. Of course on modern computer cars, you have no control over this. Make the first mile or so at slow speed and keep the rev's low till things warm up. Test the brakes before you get on the highway. Drums and disks WILL rust some unless you store your car in one of those sealed bags (not a bad idea, but I have found it unnecessary if you have a good garage) but that will go away after the first few stops.
 
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