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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchase a set of Nitto 555 RII sizes 275/40/17 and 305/35/18 going on stock 03 rims.

I am looking for a real aggressive street alignment. Anyone that has seen me drive would attest to my aggressiveness ;)

The car will be 99% street driven. I plan on testing out both Autox and DE events, if I get into it I will set car up accordingly.

I read somewhere that you can get different alignments and mark them all so you can switch back and forth from DE, Autox and aggressive street… Do you need any special suspension for this? The guys at the alignment center say I will never be able to switch back and forth with any accuracy.


Thanks in advance

Tony
 

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The problem isn't accuracy, but rather trying to torque the cams to 125 ft.-lb. The front end has to be about 18" off the ground to swing the wrench. I do it over an oil change pit.
 

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Marking the eccentrics and moving them back and forth will not be very accurate. The guys at the shop are right. You can adjust the toe easy enough. Everyone requires a little different alignment. Just go to the shop with the tires you normally run on and show them how they are wearing. They can make adjustments on what they see happening to your tires.
Toe in the front would be about 0 to 3/16 toe out. More toe out, better turn in.
Toe in the rear would be about 0 to 1/4 toe in. More toe in, better traction on exit.

Steve
 

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Tony,
I agree with the others that switching back and forth won't be that easy unless you get some toe plates and learn to do your own toe adjustments. You may be able to get camber and caster close, but there is some play in the concentric bolts so even this won't be perfect.

The problem is that changing camber and caster change toe a lot and it is hard to mark toe. If you don't adjust toe, your toe setting will be way off impacting your handling and tire wear.

For an aggressive street setup that can be used for auto-x and the track (note that the best setup for each isn't the same so this is a compromise), I suggest:
Front:
Camber: -1.2
Caster max positive matched side to side
Toe 0.1 out
Rear:
Camber: -1.0
Toe 0.1 to 0.2 in

These settings are within stock settings, but near the edge. I would expect fairly rapid tire wear with toe not set to zero and lots of negative camber, particulary on the front.

Here are the stock settings if you don't have them:
Specs:
Front Individual Toe: +0.04 degree +/- 0.10 degree
Front Sum Toe: +0.08 degree +/- 0.20 degree
Front Individual Caster: +6.9 degree +/- 0.50 degree
Front Cross Caster: within +/- 0.25 degree
Front Individual Camber: -0.70 degree +/-0.50 degree
Front Cross Camber: within +/-0.25 degree
Rear Individual Toe: -0.01 degree +/- 0.10 degree
Rear Sum Toe: -0.02 degree +/- 0.20 degree
Rear Individual Camber: -0.68 degree +/- 0.50 degree
Rear Cross Camber: within +/- 0.50 degree
 

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Once you get the Nittos you will think that it is set up for the track already, I couldn't believe how much better these tires stick over the F1's. You will think your car is attached to a rail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank You Sub,

Exactly what I was looking for ....How many miles can I expect from these settings if I used for just the street?

And how many miles more may I see if I used stock settings ...Just want to get an Idea of what I am getting myself into.

Thanks again

Tony
:thumb:

Subdriver said:
Tony,
I agree with the others that switching back and forth won't be that easy unless you get some toe plates and learn to do your own toe adjustments. You may be able to get camber and caster close, but there is some play in the concentric bolts so even this won't be perfect.

The problem is that changing camber and caster change toe a lot and it is hard to mark toe. If you don't adjust toe, your toe setting will be way off impacting your handling and tire wear.

For an aggressive street setup that can be used for auto-x and the track (note that the best setup for each isn't the same so this is a compromise), I suggest:
Front:
Camber: -1.2
Caster max positive matched side to side
Toe 0.1 out
Rear:
Camber: -1.0
Toe 0.1 to 0.2 in

These settings are within stock settings, but near the edge. I would expect fairly rapid tire wear with toe not set to zero and lots of negative camber, particulary on the front.

Here are the stock settings if you don't have them:
Specs:
Front Individual Toe: +0.04 degree +/- 0.10 degree
Front Sum Toe: +0.08 degree +/- 0.20 degree
Front Individual Caster: +6.9 degree +/- 0.50 degree
Front Cross Caster: within +/- 0.25 degree
Front Individual Camber: -0.70 degree +/-0.50 degree
Front Cross Camber: within +/-0.25 degree
Rear Individual Toe: -0.01 degree +/- 0.10 degree
Rear Sum Toe: -0.02 degree +/- 0.20 degree
Rear Individual Camber: -0.68 degree +/- 0.50 degree
Rear Cross Camber: within +/- 0.50 degree
 

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Post what settings you decide to go with. Oh, I'm also getting a set of RIIs for my Z. I hear a lot of good things about them.

Alex :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok, Well the guy that did my wheel Alignment seemed clueless. So I settle for stock settings just to get it over with... Even The stock settings seem off. Please let me know what you think and if I should bring the car back.

The reason I say this is that the caster and camber SAI and included Angle on the fronts did not change from prior settings

Also the Camber and Cross camber did not change on rears

It seems to me like he took the short cut just to get within specs. Was giving me the best I can do speech. For some reason I’m not buying. Being I know shit about wheel alignments I figured I would get my suspicions confirmed before I complained

Front Left Camber -1.0
Caster 7.3
Toe -0.04
SAI 9.5
Included Angle 8.4

Front Right Canber -0.9
Caster 7.0
Toe 0.10
SAI 9.6
Included Angle 8.7

Front
Cross Camber -0.2
Cross Caster 0.3
Cross SAI -0.2
Total Toe 0.07

Rear Left
Camber -0.5
Toe -0.01

Right Rear
Camber -0.8
Toe -0.01

Rear

Cross Camber 0.4
Total Toe -0.02
Trust Angle 0.00


Thanks
Tony
 

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Tony,
Sorry, missed your second post on the 13th. I have no idea what kind of mileage you'll get on these tires. I wore out the 220 UTQG (hardness rating - lower is softer) stock F1s very fast. If memory serves,the Nitto's are about 100 UTQG which will wear out around twice as fast as the stock tires. So, I'd ask, how long did you get out of stock and half that as a rough estimate (assuming your overall driving habits are constant).

Your alignment looks okay overall, but there are a few minor things that would have bothered me.

The front toe has one tire pointed in and one out, which really doesn't mean much as they will self center based on the caster angle. So the only real question is:
Is your steering wheel centered when you are going straight?

If it isn't, the uneven toe is likely the cause. If it is, the front is fine.

The rear camber isn't matched well, but it is within spec. For some reason, it is harder to get camber on the LR which shows. If the most negative camber they could get on the LR was -0.5, then I would've set the RR also at -0.5 instead of -0.8. But, they are close and I wouldn't lose any sleep over that difference.

As a note for next time, in my opinion, they should be able to get within 0.1 for the cross camber (and they did in the front). If I can get within 0.1 in my garage, they should be able to do it, especially on the rear since caster isn't a complicating factor. There is only one concentric bolt on the rear so this is really an easy adjustment.

Enjoy the new tires. :cheers:
 

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So Subdriver how are things in VA compared to west TN? Those Goodyears we got from you are doing great for the DE events. Jayne is busting my butt on the track!

Any way back on topic here what tools / equipment is needed to do alignments at home?
 

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Hazman said:
So Subdriver how are things in VA compared to west TN? Those Goodyears we got from you are doing great for the DE events. Jayne is busting my butt on the track!

Any way back on topic here what tools / equipment is needed to do alignments at home?
I wouldn't know how things are here... I spend all day inside studying. :eek:

Glad to hear someone is getting some use out of my tires. :D

I use the following (please email at [email protected] and I'll provide links as I'm not sure if any vendors carry this stuff)
- Longacre laser leveling system (about $400) (I use this to establish a perfectly flat platform using floor tiles from Home Depot)
- Longacre camber/caster gauge (couple hundred maybe?)
- Longacre toe plates (under $100)
- A six ft aluminum level to sight down rear tires to assist in determining thrust angle (bought at Home Depot)

And for the advanced,
- Longacre scales (corner weighting) (about $1000)

:cheers:
 

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Hazman said:
So Subdriver...what tools / equipment is needed to do alignments at home?
This is exactly why I logged in tonight - to ask what it takes to do your own alignments. I want to switch between a "street" setup, which for me would pretty much be stock, and a "track" setup, which is pretty aggressive.

Since I have been running my 315/35/17 Kumho V700 Victo's at -2.5 camber in the front and -1.5 in the rear, they are wearing nicely after a couple days at Putnam Park and a couple at Mid-Ohio, but I gotta get it back to stock now that I am on the street with the F1's!!!

:cheers:
 

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- A six ft aluminum level to sight down rear tires to assist in determining thrust angle (bought at Home Depot)




You can use a laser level to sight down rear tires to front tires for thrust angle.

Steve
 

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mountainbiker2 said:
- A six ft aluminum level to sight down rear tires to assist in determining thrust angle (bought at Home Depot)




You can use a laser level to sight down rear tires to front tires for thrust angle.

Steve
That works as well, but I find the aluminum level works just as well, is much faster, and is easier to see. :cheers:
 
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