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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys and gals,

I am getting ready to change brake pads and have seen several members state that you should crack open the bleeder screw when pushing the calipers in to prevent fluid from messing up the ABS. My question is, doesn't fluid squirt out when you press the calipers in? Doesn't air then get into the system which requires bleeding the brakes? Am I asking for trouble if I don't crack the bleeder open? Thanks for your expertise.
 

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If you crack open the OEM bleeders you must keep constant pressure on the system or you WILL suck in air.

That technique would only work properly with bleeders if you had Speedbleeders.

You can loosen the master cylinder fill cap and remove some fluid, then compress the caliper piston. (Leaving the cap off or loose too long will allow the fluid to absorb water vapor, especially in humid weather.)

You can then refill the reservoir with new fluid.

The Speedbleeders are slick and the way to go..
 

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The purpose of cracking the bleeder is so you do not send contaminates back up your brake lines. This can cause problems with ABS systems.
 

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If done carefully, you can open the bleeder and force fluid out without drawing in air. It shouldn't squirt unless you put a large amount of pressure on the pads. Just go slowly and you'll be fine. Just remember, painted surfaces do not take kindly to brake fluid.

Have fun with the project.
 

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Where do people dream up stuff like this?

Just push the piston back and slap in new pads. Unless you added fluid since the car had new pads on it you will not need to siphon anything out of the master cylinder.
 

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Dr.Ron said:
When I (we) did mine at the ECS mod party, we just squeezed the caliper enough to get the caliper off the rotor, then replaced it. No problems encountered.
Ron
Got to say this is the way I do it. However, I always bleed the brake fluid every time I change pads too. Just a matter of habit.
 

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1)connect a clean short as possible clear plastic hose to the caliper bleeder screw.
2)pour about an inch of new brake fluid into a clear clean container and submerge the other end of hose into this.
3)using a helper crack open the bleeder screw while compressing the caliper pistons.when the pistons are fully retracted close bleeder screw.

When performing this, I will after installing the new pads and mounting the caliper bleed the caliper but so far it really is just a precautionary step.

Sabot
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info fellers. :usa:
 

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A final note:

After brake pads have been replaced and/or rotors have been resurfaced, it is recommended new braking surfaces be broken in or burnished. While test driving vehicle, perform 20 stops from 30 MPH using medium to firm pedal pressure. DO NOT allow the brakes to lock. Ensure brakes do not overheat. Allow sufficient cooling periods between stops in order to properly burnish the brake pads and rotors.
 
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