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I have been looking for a DIY thread on how to change out the pads. I have seen many related topics, but non that walk through how to remove the pad from the capiler. I want to know how to remove the clips that hold the pad in place. Is there a thread here or some where else that ya'll can direct me too?

Thanks!
 

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Front Brake Pads Replacement-

Removal Procedure

1. Inspect the fluid level in the brake master cylinder reservoir.
2. If the brake fluid level is midway between the maximum-full point and the minimum allowable level, no brake fluid needs to be removed from the reservoir before proceeding.
3. If the brake fluid level is higher than midway between the maximum-full point and the minimum allowable level, remove brake fluid to the midway point before proceeding.
4. Raise and suitably support the vehicle. Refer to Vehicle Lifting. See: Maintenance/Vehicle Lifting
5. Remove the tire and wheel assembly.
6. Hand tighten a wheel lug nut to a wheel stud to secure the rotor to the hub.
7. Install large C-clamp over the body of the brake caliper with the C-clamp ends against the rear of the caliper body and against the outboard brake pad.
8. Tighten the C-clamp evenly until the caliper pistons are compressed into the caliper bores enough to allow the caliper to slide past the brake rotor.
9. Remove the C-clamp from the caliper.
10. Remove the upper brake caliper guide pin bolt.

Notice: Support the brake caliper with heavy mechanic's wire, or equivalent, whenever it is separated from it's mount and the hydraulicflexible brake hose is still connected. Failure to support the caliper in this manner will cause the flexible brake hose to bear the weight of the caliper, which may cause damage to the brake hose and in turn may cause a brake fluid leak.

11. Pivot the brake caliper body downward and secure the caliper out of the way with heavy mechanic's wire or equivalent; ensure that there is no tension on the hydraulic brake flexible hose. Do NOT disconnect the hydraulic brake flexible hose from the caliper.
12. Remove the brake pads from the caliper bracket.
13. Remove and inspect the brake pad retainers from the caliper bracket.

Installation Procedure

1. Inspect the caliper slide boots for cuts, tears, or deterioration. If damaged, replace the slides and the boots.
2. Install large C-clamp over the body of the brake caliper with the C-clamp ends against the rear of the caliper body and against an old inboard brake pad or a wood block installed against the caliper pistons.
3. Tighten the C-clamp evenly until the caliper pistons are compressed completely into the caliper bores.
4. Remove the C-clamp and the old brake pad or wood block from the caliper.
5. Install the brake pad retainers to the caliper bracket.
6. Install the brake pads to the caliper bracket. The brake pad wear sensor, mounted on the inboard brake pad, must be positioned so that it is in the trailing position during forward rotation of the brake rotor.
7. Pivot the brake caliper upward, over the brake pads and into the caliper bracket.
8. Install the upper brake caliper guide pin bolt.
- Tighten the brake caliper guide pin bolt to (23 ft. Ibs.).
9. Install the tire and wheel assembly.
10. Lower the vehicle.
11. With the engine OFF, gradually apply the brake pedal to approximately 2/3 of its travel distance.
12. Slowly release the brake pedal.
13. Wait 15 seconds, then repeat steps 11-12 until a firm brake pedal apply is obtained; this will properly seat the brake caliper pistons and brake pads.
14. Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir to the proper level.
15. Burnish the pads and rotors
 

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I am also very interested in a newbie walk-through. {edit - that was quick speedratchet!}

I'm still not clear on the c-clamp parts. Is this a pressing out (to remove) and pressing in (on installation) of the pads? So the pads are pressure fit in there? Are there pics somewhere?!

Sorry for the idiotic questions - but I just want to make sure I'm understanding this correctly. If brakes fail, I'm screwed!
 

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There are NO clip that holds the pads in.

1. Unbolt the bottom caliper bolt
2. Loosen the top Caliper bolt
3. Swing the caliper up
4. Remove the pads
5, Compress the caliper piston
6. Insert new pads
7. Swing Caliper back in place
8. Replace lower Caliper bolt *
9. Remove & Replace Upper Caliper bolt *
10. Retorque Caliper bolts.
11. Bed in pads
12. recheck torque in 1 week.

* Caliper bolts are one time Torque to yield bolts. Factory recommends replacing them after each use. They can be reused in a pinch, once or twice if threads are cleaned and new locktite is used.
 

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The pad themselves are not pressed in, but you have to push the caliper piston back when you install new pads. This gives you the necessary room to get the caliper back over the rotor. If this is your first time, you might want a knowledgeable friend be there while you do the job. ;)
 

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DJWorm said:
There are NO clip that holds the pads in.

1. Unbolt the bottom caliper bolt
2. Loosen the top Caliper bolt
3. Swing the caliper up
4. Remove the pads
5, Compress the caliper piston
6. Insert new pads
7. Swing Caliper back in place
8. Replace lower Caliper bolt *
9. Remove & Replace Upper Caliper bolt *
10. Retorque Caliper bolts.
11. Bed in pads
12. recheck torque in 1 week.

* Caliper bolts are one time Torque to yield bolts. Factory recommends replacing them after each use. They can be reused in a pinch, once or twice if threads are cleaned and new locktite is used.
DJ, Is there a specific reason you remove the LOWER bolt and pivot on the upper bolt? Isn't it more convenient to remove the UPPER bolt and pivot on the lower??
Thanks,
Charlie
 

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I used a shop rag and large channel lock pliers to compress the brake pistons back far enough to slip back over the new pads.
 

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Horse-a-piece. You can do it either way.

I just found less strain on the rubber lines with the up swing.

I also turn the wheel to the opposite side to give more room after removing the wheel/tire assembly.

I also use a KD Tools Piston Compressor rather than a C Clamp.
 

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DJWorm said:
There are NO clip that holds the pads in.

1. Unbolt the bottom caliper bolt
2. Loosen the top Caliper bolt
3. Swing the caliper up
4. Remove the pads
5, Compress the caliper piston
6. Insert new pads
7. Swing Caliper back in place
8. Replace lower Caliper bolt *
9. Remove & Replace Upper Caliper bolt *
10. Retorque Caliper bolts.
11. Bed in pads
12. recheck torque in 1 week.

* Caliper bolts are one time Torque to yield bolts. Factory recommends replacing them after each use. They can be reused in a pinch, once or twice if threads are cleaned and new locktite is used.
Good to know. Thanks. :thumb:
 

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Oh, I think I know what my problem understanding the clamp part was now. I was figuring that the piston would by default be extended out. And after clamping it, it would just pop out again. But I guess the car is off, and it does not push out again. So you clamp it down to get clearance to get the pads back on the rotor, and it stays compressed? This must be why you want to make sure the fluid level is not too high? Compressing it must force fluid back into the resevoir, and if its too full, it would spill out?

Is this correct? :) Can you tell I havent done this before yet?! :ity:
 

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Subw00er said:
Oh, I think I know what my problem understanding the clamp part was now. I was figuring that the piston would by default be extended out. And after clamping it, it would just pop out again. But I guess the car is off, and it does not push out again. So you clamp it down to get clearance to get the pads back on the rotor, and it stays compressed? This must be why you want to make sure the fluid level is not too high? Compressing it must force fluid back into the resevoir, and if its too full, it would spill out?

Is this correct? :) Can you tell I havent done this before yet?! :ity:
Now you've got it!! The piston will stay "in" when you remove the C clamp. You are also correct about the fluid in the reservoir.

Now that you comprehend the mechanics of it all...when are you getting started on the brake job?

Charlie
 

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NOTE: When compressing the C Clamp and forcing fluid back to the master cylinder you should do it slowly and allow the system to "rest" and acclumate. If you force the clamp too fast you can damage the ABS and/or the ABS solinoids and possibly force air back up into the system.

An alternative is IF you have Speed Bleeders, is to bleed off the excess pressure (and some fluid) while compressing the Caliper pistons thru the Speed Bleeders. This can't be done with OEM bleeders.
 

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DJworm - this is my next thing to learn.. bleeding brakes. I have decided that my next two upgrades are brake cooling ducts (still trying to decide which ones - opinions welcomed) and goodrich SS lines. Can you tell me about the speedbleeders, what are they for? How do they make it easier? Are they a valve so you dont have to remove the link from the caliper to get fluid out? Where do I get em, price?
 

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There is an old thread with pictures that shows the complete process. I made a copy of it about 3 years ago for when I would need it. I don't have time now to try and find it but it is stored somewhere in here. Perhaps another old head will have a link.
Mike
 

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MSiska said:
I used a shop rag and large channel lock pliers to compress the brake pistons back far enough to slip back over the new pads.

Yep that will work. But a two point brake pad compression tool is under twenty bucks at SEARS for their top model. Decided that this was well worth it since I have done brakes three times so far this year (and a forth will be needed soon), with all the track driving I am doing. The right tool really does make it easier to do.
 

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Cool thread. Going to the track this Friday and will need to swap out pads. Never done it, but was passing by Sears and found a 3-ton jack, two stands and a creeper for $99. Two more stands and a couple of boards and I'm set to lift! Good luck, all other folks doing brakes this weekend.
--Yak
 
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