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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The day I bought my Z from my brother in law a couple weeks ago he had it in for some brake service that morning (they turned the front rotors as it was pulsating and they said the rotors needed it).

After the hard drive today with the group the brakes were pulsating alot during some hard braking. I am not sure why its still doing it unless the rear rotors should have maybe been turned also.

I am deciding on either getting some drilled/slotted rotors (I really dont think I need them) or just taking it into Chevy and having them look at it again and maybe turn the rears this time as there is a definate problem I think. I havnt actually done any brake work in 20 years and I am unsure how easy it is to change rotors on this Vette. I really havnt had time to read up on the process or know what all needs to come off to do it.

Am I going to see a big difference in the stock rotors over drilled/slotted ones? The car isnt raced, but today I could tell they could use something. Also there are so many rotor brands out there what is everyone using?

Thanks much
 

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Pulsating brake pedal is usually either:
- warped rotors
- pad taper
- excessive run out

This is usually due to hard braking which produces excessive heat. It can also occur if the pads are not bedded in properly. (NOTE: pads should be bedded in after installation of new or newly turned rotors)

Some things you should know:

- The OEM rotors are the weakest link. They have poor metallurgy and are made in Brazil.
- The OEM rotors have a propensity to warp and crack.
- Turning rotors should only be used to remove slight and very shallow surface imperfections. Turning rotors markedly reduces their ability to dissipate heat and only compounds the problem.
- drilled rotors crack even sooner

My recommendation is to:
- install new pads and bed them in correctly
- install new rotors

If your car is not raced at all and sees only street use I recommend replacing the rotors with cheap NAPA rotors and then consider them an almost dissposable item requiring constant monitoring and possible change again in the future.

If you want some "bling" for street use only you might consider the Baer rotors.

If you track the car at all, there are things to do to upgrade the OEM brakes.
 

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I agree with DJ.
The rear rotors can also cause pulsating, sometimes more than you would believe.
Replacing all 4 rotors is pretty easy and I think the cost is about $100.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I know the dealer did NOT replace the brake pads when they turned the front rotos as you could look at the rotors and see the wear pattern was not flat. They also broke 2 wheel studs in the process when putting rims back on also. They might of planned on doing the rears but I was suppose to pick the car up that morning when all this happened and they got put under a time factor. My brother in law was just trying to get the car in as good as condition before selling it to me.

I will have to get to the bottom of it because the pulsation was really bad to the point I had to let up on the brakes.
 

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Pedal pulsation

If the pedal pulsation continued even after the rotors were turned, you may want to check 2 things:
(1) Pull the rotor off the hub and clean the hub flange thoroughly with a wire brush to get all the rust off of it. The rust buildup between the rotor and the hub flange can be enough to affect runout.
(2) Check wheel bearing play and then check the runout of the hub itself. You'll need a dial indicator and a gooseneck style clamp mount. If you don't have these tools, you may be able to get a local brake shop to help you out. Typically lateral runout in excess of 0.005" (five thousandths) is enough to be felt in the pedal.

Good luck!

-Greg W
 
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