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Clutch Master Cylinder Install Instructions

The photos can be viewed larger at this website: tick Photo Gallery by Paul at pbase.com

Time listed below is cumulative time for installing the Tick adjustable master not the time for that step. Replacing the clutch master with an oem unit will take less time.

Below are a few photos showing you the OEM unit next to the Tick unit. Tick unit is metal, OEM is plastic. Tick unit has straight slave fluid line, OEM line has several kinks and looks to be a smaller inner diameter.






Starting Time: 0:00

1) Jack up front of car and remove driver side front wheel (Wheel nuts 19mm socket)

2) Disconnect clutch fluid line quick disconnect fitting by sliding the plastic ring inward. This is located on driver side between the frame and the engine. I use a fuel disconnect tool see below:
Time: 0:15





3) Remove lower portion of inner fender to get to master cylinder. (6) 7mm screws in wheel well and (2) 7mm screws underneath. If you installed “frame savers” it may prohibit your ability to remove the piece all together. I just let it hang down as shown below:
Time: 0:20




3a) In the photo below, notice those alien “pods” hanging down. Give them a pinch and see what falls, mine were full of leaves and bugs.





4) Remove panel in the driver’s foot compartment where the courtesy light is mounted. There should be two round gray plugs in the front. They will pull straight down. In the rear, near the firewall, I had a metal speed nut. If anyone knows of a technique to remove a speed nut I would like to hear it. If it weren’t for my difficulty removing the speed nut this would be done in about 2 minutes. Instead it took me 10. Once you get the panel down unclip the courtesy light and let it hang.
Time: 0:35

5) Remove master rod clip from clutch pedal. Below is a photo of the clip so you can see how it comes off. Once off, remove the rod from the pedal and let it hang.




IF YOU ARE INSTALLING AN OEM MASTER YOU CAN SKIP STEP 6
6) Remove the dead pedal/fourth pedal. 10mm deep socket. I tried to skip this step until I noticed the upper bolt holds the dead pedal over the bottom of the clutch pedal assembly you will remove shortly.
Time: 0:45


7) Reach in and twist the master cylinder counter clockwise to release it from the firewall. Leave it for now and it should look like this:




IF YOU ARE INSTALLING AN OEM MASTER YOU CAN SKIP STEP 8
8) Remove the two clips that hold the clutch fluid reservoir. Pull outward on the inner plastic pin not the outer piece. The fasteners are something like this (shown with center pin pulled out):




9) Remove fluid from master fluid reservoir and clean out as best as you can. Then disconnect reservoir line from master cylinder. Remove the master with the line going to the slave cylinder and (reservoir – tick only). The easy part is over.
Time: 0:55

IF YOU ARE INSTALLING AN OEM MASTER YOU CAN SKIP STEPS 10-15
10) Remove the clutch pedal assembly by removing the sensor plug near the base and then the (3) 13mm nuts. A ratchet wrench (longer the better) is a must. Here is a photo of the sensor plug and the nuts you need to remove:






Here is a photo of what you are taking out: (Tick Master install only)




Pull out pedal assembly and there should be a wire fastened to the side of the assembly (see top photo in the above set (left side of assembly), use needle-nose pliers to pinch the fastener inside the pedal assembly and push it outward. Move the assembly to your workbench. While you are still swearing about how hard it is to get up there and remove those 3 nuts just keep in mind it’s going to be a whole lot harder getting them back on later….
Time: 1:10

11) Once you have the pedal assembly on your workbench there is this paper template but not a whole lot of instructions. Here is where the template goes, there is a small hole in the pedal assembly you use to line it up. And what it looks like after you center punch for your new holes and what it looks like after the two holes are drilled out. 3/8” bit required.








12) Now mount the Tick master to the pedal assembly and secure with the two allen bolts. Sorry I forgot to take a photo of this step. You are going to mount the master so the fluid cap on top of the master is tilted at 2:00, it’s not straight up. Attach the rod to the pedal and install the clip. Remove the spring from the clutch pedal. There are no instructions to re-install the spring so place it in your spare parts box. Do not install the hose or line yet. You might want to test fit the white plastic cap because it’s not easy to install in the tight quarters of the firewall.
Time: 1:35.

13) Reinstall the pedal assembly with the new master cylinder attached. Attach the wire/fastener on left side of assembly while getting it lined up. It’s not as easy as taking it out since the master is installed. The rubber cap on the reservoir came off during this process as it was poked through the firewall, so keep an eye out for it. Once it is in place and looks good coming out the firewall, find a person with small hands to get those (3) 13mm nuts back on. Of course with the master in place it makes it even worse. I just tried a nut at a time in my hand and just felt my way up in there. I spent about 45 minutes getting these on, it should only take 10-15 at most, but I’m a big guy and I’m not in the best shape to work in awkward positions for any length of time. Attach sensor plug to sensor.
Time: 1:50




14) Install the white plastic reservoir adapter and have it facing upwards towards the clutch fluid reservoir. Note how it was mounted in the above photo. Install the clamp. The adapter can be a pita as it is very tight. This is the point where I used a razor blade and cut off the firewall grommet from the old master cylinder because it provides a much better fit. I positioned the cut at the bottom and the grommet can be seen in the above photo. I cut the end of my clutch fluid reservoir tube because it was already enlarged from the former master cylinder fitting. Cutting the end off helps make a stronger fitting on the white plastic adapter
Time: 2:05


15) Install the clutch fluid reservoir and attach the tube to the new master cylinder. I used an automotive clamp instead of the provided wire ties to secure the hose. Screw on the supplied master cylinder fluid line to the blue Earl’s fitting and tighten. Let the slave cylinder line hang out as seen in the above photo


IF INSTALLING THE TICK CLUTCH MASTER SKIP STEP 16
16) OEM install only! Move slave cylinder fluid line to new master cylinder by tapping out pin. Once you have the fluid line installed, insert new master from fender wheel well access and twist to lock in. Let the slave cylinder line hang out as seen in the above photo. Attach reservoir line to new master cylinder. From inside the car attach master cylinder rod to clutch pedal with clip.


17) Fill reservoir with DOT 3/4 fluid. Press in on the plastic check valve at the end of the slave cylinder line using the flat end of a drill bit or something similar that won’t damage the plastic check valve!! Wait for fluid to flow from the check valve. Refill reservoir as necessary. If you don’t have a remote bleeder installed for your slave cylinder, keep running fluid through this line to gravity bleed this part of the system and watch fluid until it comes out clean. Remember to install cap on reservoir.
Time: 2:20


18) Connect the new fluid line to the slave cylinder line. Check that the line is away from headers or any moving parts, use wire ties as necessary to secure the line. If you have a slave speed bleeder line now is the time to bleed the system until the fluid runs clear.
Time: 2:35


19) Double check the reservoir cap is on. Check the pedal assembly for feel. If the pedal is soft, pump gradually. Start the car and test it.


TICK ONLY INSTALL STEP:
20) Install dead pedal. Once you have adjusted the clutch pedal (may take a few test drives) Install courtesy light into trim panel. Install trim panel under dash.


This project took me about 4 hours total and that include taking photos and documenting little things along the way and searching for a few tools that were misplaced and cleaning inside the fender.
 

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PAUL, You are the man! I just started reading this and already want to say THANK YOU!

Going back to read...starting NOW 10:30 AM

Just got done. TIME NOW: 10:47 AM.

Wow. 4 hours? I think a drive out to Kansas would be quicker for me. : )

Great write up. Any results yet?

Questions I have: What are your initial impressions of the unit? Build quality, feel, comparison to the OEM unit.

How difficult is it to "adjust" the unit and, did you start out with the unit extended to equal stock length?

If you started at stock length, did you find that you needed to adjust the TICK longer or shorter to make the pedal/shifting feel "just right" and how did you adjust the increments? 5 threads at a time? 10 threads? etc.

Now that you did this once, how fast do you think you can do it again?

(Dictates my drive to Kanasas...Hahahahaha)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
PAUL, You are the man! I just started reading this and already want to say THANK YOU!

Going back to read...starting NOW 10:30 AM

Just got done. TIME NOW: 10:47 AM.

Wow. 4 hours? I think a drive out to Kansas would be quicker for me. : )

Great write up. Any results yet?

Questions I have: What are your initial impressions of the unit? Build quality, feel, comparison to the OEM unit.

How difficult is it to "adjust" the unit and, did you start out with the unit extended to equal stock length?

If you started at stock length, did you find that you needed to adjust the TICK longer or shorter to make the pedal/shifting feel "just right" and how did you adjust the increments? 5 threads at a time? 10 threads? etc.

Now that you did this once, how fast do you think you can do it again?

(Dictates my drive to Kanasas...Hahahahaha)
Glenn,
It fixed my high speed shift problem because the clutch wasn't disengaging properly. Of course now I have to get used to shifting a 510rwhp Corvette at 6xxx rpms which is a bit scary :lol:

The pedal is stiffer and I'm not sure if that's because my old master was worn (43k miles). The Tick unit is metal vs. plastic and much more solid. The stock unit has all those connections and bends in the fluid line I just don't like vs. the one nice line connected to the Tick master.

Probably the only complaint is that white reservoir cap is right up against the firewall. It would be nice if it was out about an inch to help with installation and clearance.


Installation should take 2.5 hours or less. I could do it in 1.5 hours again - like I said I took time to take photos and write notes down and clean out the inner fender. The biggest pita is trying to reach up there and get those 3 bolts off and then back on. I'm 6'5" and a "solid" 280 lbs. My hands are big and I just had a lot of problems with it.

I just installed the unit as it was shipped so the pedal was near the floor. I adjusted it out (raised the pedal probably 1"). I want to clutch to engage close to the floor so I'm still tinkering with it. Adjustment isn't hard, but it's awkward. I took a couple towels for my knees so I could adjust it in a parking lot and drive it around and adjust it again. My immediate neighborhood and driveway are very steep so I couldn't do it easily from my driveway Plus I didn't want the neighbors to experience the awsomeness of me sitting in front of the house with the tranny in gear and clutch in and taking the rpms to 6000 to see if the clutch was still grabbing.
 

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Glenn,
It fixed my high speed shift problem because the clutch wasn't disengaging properly. Of course now I have to get used to shifting a 510rwhp Corvette at 6xxx rpms which is a bit scary :lol:

The pedal is stiffer and I'm not sure if that's because my old master was worn (43k miles). The Tick unit is metal vs. plastic and much more solid. The stock unit has all those connections and bends in the fluid line I just don't like vs. the one nice line connected to the Tick master.

Probably the only complaint is that white reservoir cap is right up against the firewall. It would be nice if it was out about an inch to help with installation and clearance.


Installation should take 2.5 hours or less. I could do it in 1.5 hours again - like I said I took time to take photos and write notes down and clean out the inner fender. The biggest pita is trying to reach up there and get those 3 bolts off and then back on. I'm 6'5" and a "solid" 280 lbs. My hands are big and I just had a lot of problems with it.

I just installed the unit as it was shipped so the pedal was near the floor. I adjusted it out (raised the pedal probably 1"). I want to clutch to engage close to the floor so I'm still tinkering with it. Adjustment isn't hard, but it's awkward. I took a couple towels for my knees so I could adjust it in a parking lot and drive it around and adjust it again. My immediate neighborhood and driveway are very steep so I couldn't do it easily from my driveway Plus I didn't want the neighbors to experience the awsomeness of me sitting in front of the house with the tranny in gear and clutch in and taking the rpms to 6000 to see if the clutch was still grabbing.
I think I may have to test this theory out prior to buying a new transmission.

PM Sent.....
 

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Absolutely awesome write up! I think I have the same problem Glenn is facing, so sounds like that will have to be my next mod, too!

Paul, any chance you could post or PM me info on where you found the best price for the Tick?

Glenn, get some practice putting it in, and you can do mine in March! :lol: Sure is getting harder for me to crawl into the footwell, nowdays... ...I can already feel my back hurting!

Thanks!
Scott

:cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Absolutely awesome write up! I think I have the same problem Glenn is facing, so sounds like that will have to be my next mod, too!

Paul, any chance you could post or PM me info on where you found the best price for the Tick?

Glenn, get some practice putting it in, and you can do mine in March! :lol: Sure is getting harder for me to crawl into the footwell, nowdays... ...I can already feel my back hurting!

Thanks!
Scott

:cheers:
Thanks Scott.
I bought it directly from Tick. The problem I had is easy to duplicate. Put the car in 1st gear, press the clutch all the way in and increase the rpms all the way up. If you have the problem I had, your car will start rolling once the rpms reach about 5500 rpms. When shifting at high rpms the shifter just won't budge until the rpms drop to around 5000 rpms.
 

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TICK and NEW SPEEDBLEEDER ORDERED! $369.95 SHIPPED.

The new speed bleeder has a check valve in it to allow a one man bleed. The current one I have requires two person operation. One at the fluid release end and one pressing the clutch pedal. This new one, I guess is designed to allow fluid out, and when the pressure of fluid is minimul, it shuts off somehow. Allowing one person to be needed.

I think I tried that rev up to high RPM at a stand still issue and it didn't affect my car at all. However, I would have bought a new master if I needed to take out the tranny anyways. If I do the tranny, all new clutch components are going in.....

So, maybe we can install our adjustables at the Winterfest together? (Dyno day would be a good day to hang out, rip 'em open, and do the install then clean up the dyno when we are done)

Mine should be here by next week since I completed the order last night.

Direct order through the manufacturer's website using PAYPAL. An effortless order. Took about 1 minute total and 30 seconds of that was updating my shipping address.
 

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Paul -

Nice writeup !!! Hmmm 1.5 hours - maybe I should fly you in!!! :):)

I just layed it all out on the bench for the install. Looks like a nice piece..... Probably won't get to it `till next week though.... :mah:

Thanks again :cheers: - Stry
 

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Paul! I just went out to teh local biggest parking lot and did the test all over again. There was a gentle slope, so I let my car roll down until it met the upslope to ensure car was NOT rolling. Sat for 15 seconds or so before I began my test. Can was perfectly still.

Pressed the clutch pedal in all the way

Placed the car into 1st gear

Slowly revved car up to 5000 RPMs

Car started to roll good enough to get me moving and burning the clutch.


I had my center console apart and the smoke from the clutch was coming up through the exposed shiter area. Last time I smelled my clutch like that was Race Wars, in Germany!


So, it is in need a fact that I do hav ethe same exact symptoms now. HOPEFULLY it is NOT my transmission!!! Thats the GOOD news....The other good news is, my TICK comes on Thursday next week.

I am going back out to make a video demonstration now..... Just to see how far my car will roll in a 5 second period.


BRB!!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Paul! I just went out to teh local biggest parking lot and did the test all over again. There was a gentle slope, so I let my car roll down until it met the upslope to ensure car was NOT rolling. Sat for 15 seconds or so before I began my test. Can was perfectly still.

Pressed the clutch pedal in all the way

Placed the car into 1st gear

Slowly revved car up to 5000 RPMs

Car started to roll good enough to get me moving and burning the clutch.


I had my center console apart and the smoke from the clutch was coming up through the exposed shiter area. Last time I smelled my clutch like that was Race Wars, in Germany!


So, it is in need a fact that I do hav ethe same exact symptoms now. HOPEFULLY it is NOT my transmission!!! Thats the GOOD news....The other good news is, my TICK comes on Thursday next week.

I am going back out to make a video demonstration now..... Just to see how far my car will roll in a 5 second period.


BRB!!
Glenn,
You just take the rpms all the way up to 6000 and it should start to roll at some point before 6000 rpms, then stop. Don't hold it and burn up your clutch!!
 

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Paul, I didn't know that you are supposed to stop right away. I did it for 5 seconds to see just how far it would make the car travel. The car went 9 feet 3" in 4.78 seconds time frame.

The second time I tried it, it did not do it. Or the third. But it did it again on the 4th attempt right at 6000 rpms.

What I realized is, when I push the clutch pedal in and put the car into 1st gear..... I give it about 30 seconds in that position before I rev up the RPMs because the 2nd and 3rd attempt I tried it right away and nothing happened. Would this mean that waiting 30 seconds or so holding in th epedal while in 1st gear, there is a "leak" somewhere? Something is allowing the pressure to escape somewhere.

Or, could it be because I have a dual friction clutch and sometimes this happens.

This is the first I am experiencing this hydralic issue. Is it a better percentage knowing this now that my "shift issues" is quit epossibly not transmission related any longer??

VIDEO TO THE TEST: YouTube - Clutch Test
 

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NOTES FROM MY INSTALL EXPERIENCE TO ADD TO PAUL S's ADVENTURE

I needed a few tools, but one that helped me BIG TIME was one of them mechanic "Head light" headband type flashlight. Worked like a charm!!! Got it at Autozone for $7.99 with batteries.

For those of you who will attempt this challenging task, I highly suggest you add Driver Seat Removal to your intinerary. Experienced mechanic, 5-10 minutes. Not knowing how to disconnect the electric wires? 30 minutes or less.

Separating the Clutch Hydraulic Line: the GM J-36621 tool can be found for as low as $5.99 at Merles Automotives, and $8.99 at Sears ONLINE. If you can't separate the coupling, try using a set of Channel Locks. What you do is squeeze the coupling together, rotate, repeat. Do this about 5 times and you will feel the channel locks squeeze the coupling together very easy. A good sign. If your sleeve is chewed up like mine was, the channel locks helped seat it inside the casing. I just squeezed the sleeve and the case together, rotated, repeated. After 3 turns, it separated. Re-Installing: After speaking with Jim Lembo, an 11/16s open end wrench works the same as the J Tool. When you get your new TICK, place the 11/16s on the new Master Line fitting and verify if this is how you want to install it. The 11/16th fits near flawless, but there is a hairline of play. Your call.

The 3 13mm nuts on the clutch pedal assembly: A 13mm ratchet wrench works just fine to remove, but is NOT going to work for the reinstallation. As Paul stated, an extension of 12" or longer will make life easier when re-installing but a wratchet that can make a 90* angle will work best when coupled with an extension and the wratchet handle is at the bottom of that extension. Hard to describe, but my univesal adapter joint was only flexible to a 45* angle, not a 90. If anyone knows what this type of tool is called, please help us identify it.

When installing the Master to the clutch housing unit: You will need a wratchet, 8mm bit, 12" extension, and a universal socket joint that wobbles. Lock-tite if you don't want to pull the assembly out again due to loose bolts. When installing, ensure you assemble the Master Cylinder at the 2 O' Clock position. If you are dislexic in thought or vision (like I was) you will realize this as soon as you push it through the firewall and the master reservoir fitment is facing towards the engine and not the wheel well. Remember, INSTALLING at the 2 O' Clock. Then turn the assembly over and look at it as if you were going to step on the clutch. The reservoir should now be facing 10 O' Clock, or the outside of car when pushed through the firewall.

Troubles installing the white plastic reservoir: It was extrememly difficult to get over the Master Cylinder fitment, so I boiled a small amount of water, no more than 1/2 inch deep. I sat the plastic reservoir adapter in it for about 60 seconds. Ensure that when you take it out of the water (if you choose this route) that you have the reservoir in your hand the way it needs to be seated with the spout upwards but not too far that it is close to the firewall. I made that mistake on my first attempt and luckily, I was able to remove it without cracking that spout off. Once removed from the boiling water, immediately place on the Master Cylinder and quickly make final adjustments. The boiling water allowed the plastic to expand some, but you don't have much time to accomplish this because it begins to cool as soon as you remove it from the boiling water and it hits the cool air.

Firewall gasket: The gasket comes off when removing the old master cylinder. This will be reused with your new TICK. But seeing the TICK shaft is thicker than the stock master cylinder, I am uncertain at this point how the gasket must be cut. Awaiting PAUL S expertise as his looks really good.
 

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17) Fill reservoir with DOT 3/4 fluid. Press in on the plastic check valve at the end of the slave cylinder line using the flat end of a drill bit or something similar that won’t damage the plastic check valve!! Wait for fluid to flow from the check valve. Refill reservoir as necessary. If you don’t have a remote bleeder installed for your slave cylinder, keep running fluid through this line to gravity bleed this part of the system and watch fluid until it comes out clean. Remember to install cap on reservoir.
Time: 2:20


If you bleed it this way do you still have to have someone press the pedal and turn the bleed screw? I am a bone head and forgot to install my remote bleeder when i installed my clutch. duh
 

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Well, that does suck that you forgot to install that. Ideally you should not have to bleed it with the screw on the slave and someone pushing the pedal. Supposedly the quick disconnect is not supposed to allow air in. Gravity bleeding like step 17 described should get all air out of the master cylinder and no air should be able to enter the slave....so you should be ok. With that said, I would still really want to get in there and completely bleed the system. I guess you could gravity bleed it, connect the fitting, get in the car and see if the pedal gets stiff after a few pumps of the pedal...if not then you know you still have air in it and need to bleed it...if it is good and firm then you are fine. I'd say you have a good chance of being ok, but you will just have to check it out.
 

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thanks, i am going to try it today.
 

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What trans problems can cause that with the clutch engaged it creeps forward?

I always thought this was 100% an issue with the clutch itself... Sometimes you feel like the trans is hard to shift in first and reverse?
 

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Damn awsome post with detailed instructions unfortunately the pics dont link up anymore, and I tryied to PM Paul but his account doesnt accept PM's. Anyone have the detailed instructions still with the pics.

Greatly appreciated
 

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Damn awsome post with detailed instructions unfortunately the pics dont link up anymore, and I tryied to PM Paul but his account doesnt accept PM's. Anyone have the detailed instructions still with the pics.

Greatly appreciated
Unfortunately, Paul sold his Z and moved on some years ago.

Mike
 
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