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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
According to an interview by corvettemagazine.com with Dave Hill, and re-printed in the December "America's Sports Car," magazine (NCM official publication, free to NCM members), here is Mr. Hill's comment:

Q: Is there currently under development a semi-automatic transmission (i.e. Ferrari's paddle shift) for the Z06?

DH: "Today our customers seem to fall into two categories: those who want to do all the shifting all of the time and others who appreciate the automatic transmission that we have. We are continuing to consider alternatives for the future."

Zippy :z: :z:
 
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I'm as cheap as the next guy (maybe cheaper LOL )but if Corvette rolled out a 2400 dollar sequential shifter like BMW's SMG II..

I'd pay cash on the spot for the Corvette..

I think daves' market research needs work when it comes to this issue..

He will over time be proven wrong on this..

even though he left himself and out..this is a delay of cutting edge technology..that many high performance cars will have.

Would be cool!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
JB:

"We are considering alternatives."

My interpretation of this...... "Look for it on the C6." :D (we'll see if Zip's prediction comes true).
 

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I'm this way about paddle shifters:

If it's a paddle actuated clutchless manual, I'm all for it. A toy gimmick hooked to an automatic is of zero interest to me.

I'm not up on what's out there in "shiftable automatics" other than the Porsche and BMW stuff... both not my cup of tea.

The Ferrari system, on the other hand, is nice and I enjoyed it's paddle shiftering very much. Costly to repair though....

The Ferrari is a bona fide manual, not a gimmicked auto.
 

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BOBSZ06 said:
I believe it will happen...just a matter of when. When technology improves the operation of the car and the ease of use within a benefit to cost ratio that is worthy of the improvement, then should show up on the car as an option at least. The competition will pressure many in the right direction.
You may be right. The true clutchless takes a bit of getting used to at low speed.

Educating customers as to what to expect and adjustments to be made in the "normal" day-to-day driving style is a slippery slope for manufacturers.

Paddle shifted clutchless manuals are sweet in a roadracing environment and left foot braking with precision is a cinch in a trailbraking situation. The same can be said for a straight cut geared Hewland or Jerico transmission. The tradeoff with a straight cust tranny is the "in your face" gear whine. The tradeoff with a paddle shifted clutchless is changing your style of accelerator pedal modulation at shift points to match the speed of the shift and automated clutch actuation or accepting "jerky, just learned to drive a clutch" low medium shift feel ... If you have driven a clutchless you would know exactly what I'm talking about.

Many folks have no idea of how it works and what it involves in driving style change... to a manufacturer it's a satisfaction issue, or maybe better stated a "dissatisfaction" issue when the product works as it's designed to but the owner is not willing to adjust to using the product to get what they are used to. You might see where a situation can arise when the owner thinks it's "broken" and the dealer says "you don't know how to use it".
Either way the owner is unhappy. Should you try to engineer around it to mask the reality, then you lose the performance edge and raise the compelxity for simplicity sake.

You'd just have to drive a clutchless to understand what I'm talking about.

They are NOT the equivalent to an automatic trans driven by someone familiar with driving an automatic and "manually" shifting... largely because there's no torque converter to insulate and cushion the shift, and a lazy gaspedal technique that has little negative impact on shift smoothness with an auto does not have the same results with a clutchless.. For a person familiar with a standard manual with a foot operated clutch, low-medium rpm shift is similar IF you modulate the gas IN TIME with the tranmissions shifting < as if you were still having to pedal the clutch yourself >, IOW, practice is involved. You have to time yourself to the speed the clutch < which you have no tactile connection to > is releasing/engaging.

Practice is no big deal for some, a fun challenge for others, and unthinkable for far more.

Most folks that buy a car, particularly an expensive one, don't want to relearn how to drive, even if they should.
 

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Just curious...for those that have driven a true clutchless manual...how do you pull away from a dead stop without a torque converter? Also do you have to put it into neutral when approaching a stop? Just wondering how that works.

Thanks in advance!

Paul
 
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