Corvette Z06 Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
I recently replaced the OEM control arm bushings in my 2003 Z06 with the VB and P graphite impregnated polyurethane bushings. There was nothing wrong with the OEM bushings, I just wanted to try the VB and P bushings. I had read about burning and cutting the OEM bushings and didn't like that. I tried a different method that allowed me to remove and install all of the bushings in a control arm in 15 minutes without a mess. I would like to share this method with you.

I made a tool that enabled me to do this job using materials that I had in the shop. I cut two 14.5" lengths of 2"x2"x0.125" steel tubing and two 8" lengths of 2"x0.5" steel bar. I then welded these into a rectangle with the bar and tubing pieces opposite each other. The inside length is 14.5" and the inside width is 4". The materials do not need to be this heavy. Here is a photo:



This tool makes it possible to press the bushing out from inside to outside.

I used a Snap-on bearing separator, part CJ 951, although any appropriately sized separator will work. Using a drift pin I knocked the washers off the control arm ends, where applicable, and fastened the bearing separator around the bushing. Here is a picture:



I then placed this set-up in an inexpensive hydraulic press, using a 4" length of 1" diameter steel bar from a bolt to press out the bushing. Here are some pictures:



A closer look:


The bushings come out quickly and easily without any mess. Note that the tool is wired to the press so it won't fall on your foot when the bushing comes free! The control arm is held in position with your hand so it will not fall.

The VB and P bushing can be installed using a vice and goes in easily. I DID NOT lubricate the outside of the bushings as I did not want them to spin inside the control arms. I also did not use the VB and P grease, never looked at it. I used Energy Suspension part number 9.11104, a very tenacious teflon based lubricant that is resistant to water. I believe that this is what Dick Guldstrand refers to as 'monkey grease'. It works very well and there are no squeaks after more than a thousand miles.

I hope that this will be of help to those of you who are interested in this modification. The job wasn't very difficult and can be done in about six hours at an easy pace working on jack stands. If you are in my area I will help you with the pressing if I can. Have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Re: Simple Control Arm Bushing Replacement

Wouldn't you know it! The photos did not appear in the text. Hopefully a moderator can help with this. I can do the mechanical work but need more practice with the computer skills.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
21,348 Posts
Re: Simple Control Arm Bushing Replacement

Took care of it Dave. A little SNAFU with the pic editor. If you paste your URL into the pic editor, you'll get double
[/img].
You only need one set of img tags, otherwise you get the dreaded red X.

What you need to do is delete the "http://" that shows in the editor when you click on the icon (mountain).

Nice write-up by the way!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Re: Simple Control Arm Bushing Replacement

Jub Jub:
Thank you very much for the help, I really appreciate it very much. This method makes this job so much easier.

I will do additional write-ups about doing the actual job. There is no need to remove the calipers, rotors or half-shafts as many people do and this saves a great deal of time. I will try to get that done ASAP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
Re: Simple Control Arm Bushing Replacement

Thanks for the writeup Dave. You definitely have better tools than I do. When I move to DC next summer, probably my last Navy move, I'm looking to get the house with the shop/garage I've wanted for about 6 or 7 years now. Need room for cool things like lifts, welders, hydraulic presses, air compressors, etc. :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
thanks, DavePro. this is exactly what I've been looking for since I talked with a guy from Boise who told me that after he replaced his bushings, he felt that the car on street tires drove like it was on track tires. If I can find his address I'll verify. this procedure is very spendy, but as you have shown, it is a DIY with the correct tool. Is that a harbor friend Item?
Brad, how'd the garage search come out?
From, "you might be a racer if..."

The requirements you give your real estate agent are (in order of importance): 1) 8 car climate
controlled garage with an attached shop.
2) Outside parking for 6 cars, a motorhome, a crew cab dualie, a 28'enclosed trailer and a 34' 5th wheel.
3) 3 phase 220V outlets in the garage for your welder.
4) A grease pit.
5) Convenient to a hazardous waste disposal site.
6) Deaf neighbors.
7) Across the street from a paint and body shop.
8) Some sort of house with a working toilet and shower on the property somewhere -or- hookups
for the motorhome.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,520 Posts
The press is useless without the jig you made up. That's cool...good to see people figuring things out :gjob:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Hi Bob:

Yes, that is a press from Harbor Freight. You need to make the tool in order to use the press. It is really a very simple job and, in my opinion, the car is much more responsive in the corners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Neat tool and great documentation.

I haven't done the bushings on my Z but I made tools to do the one's on my Mustang. Many people suggested drilling, burning, beating, etc, etc on those. I simply took a 1/2" drive socket that was large enough for the big end of the bushing to go into and a 1/2" socket that would fit through the bushing hole in the control arm. I ran a piece of 1/2" threaded rod through the whole mess, added flat washers and nuts. I double nutted one end. I tightened the nuts until it pulled the bushings out. Reversed the operation to pull the new bushings in.

Not as nice as having pics and all but you get the idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
733 Posts
QUOTE=Darth Vader;1292356]Neat tool and great documentation.

I haven't done the bushings on my Z but I made tools to do the one's on my Mustang. Many people suggested drilling, burning, beating, etc, etc on those. I simply took a 1/2" drive socket that was large enough for the big end of the bushing to go into and a 1/2" socket that would fit through the bushing hole in the control arm. I ran a piece of 1/2" threaded rod through the whole mess, added flat washers and nuts. I double nutted one end. I tightened the nuts until it pulled the bushings out. Reversed the operation to pull the new bushings in.

Not as nice as having pics and all but you get the idea.[/QUOTE]

:gjob:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
thanks, DavePro. this is exactly what I've been looking for since I talked with a guy from Boise who told me that after he replaced his bushings, he felt that the car on street tires drove like it was on track tires. If I can find his address I'll verify. this procedure is very spendy, but as you have shown, it is a DIY with the correct tool. Is that a harbor friend Item?
Brad, how'd the garage search come out?
From, "you might be a racer if..."

The requirements you give your real estate agent are (in order of importance): 1) 8 car climate
controlled garage with an attached shop.
2) Outside parking for 6 cars, a motorhome, a crew cab dualie, a 28'enclosed trailer and a 34' 5th wheel.
3) 3 phase 220V outlets in the garage for your welder.
4) A grease pit.
5) Convenient to a hazardous waste disposal site.
6) Deaf neighbors.
7) Across the street from a paint and body shop.
8) Some sort of house with a working toilet and shower on the property somewhere -or- hookups
for the motorhome.

Nice set of priorities! But you won't be able to get 3 phase to a residential property. I have a 3000lbs engine lathe that requires 3 phase and the power company laughed at me when I asked them to set this service up at my house. You will need to get a static converter to get 3 phase at your home. They work great and only run about $100.00. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I recently replaced the OEM control arm bushings in my 2003 Z06 with the VB and P graphite impregnated polyurethane bushings. There was nothing wrong with the OEM bushings, I just wanted to try the VB and P bushings. I had read about burning and cutting the OEM bushings and didn't like that. I tried a different method that allowed me to remove and install all of the bushings in a control arm in 15 minutes without a mess. I would like to share this method with you.

I made a tool that enabled me to do this job using materials that I had in the shop. I cut two 14.5" lengths of 2"x2"x0.125" steel tubing and two 8" lengths of 2"x0.5" steel bar. I then welded these into a rectangle with the bar and tubing pieces opposite each other. The inside length is 14.5" and the inside width is 4". The materials do not need to be this heavy. Here is a photo:



This tool makes it possible to press the bushing out from inside to outside.

I used a Snap-on bearing separator, part CJ 951, although any appropriately sized separator will work. Using a drift pin I knocked the washers off the control arm ends, where applicable, and fastened the bearing separator around the bushing. Here is a picture:



I then placed this set-up in an inexpensive hydraulic press, using a 4" length of 1" diameter steel bar from a bolt to press out the bushing. Here are some pictures:



A closer look:


The bushings come out quickly and easily without any mess. Note that the tool is wired to the press so it won't fall on your foot when the bushing comes free! The control arm is held in position with your hand so it will not fall.

The VB and P bushing can be installed using a vice and goes in easily. I DID NOT lubricate the outside of the bushings as I did not want them to spin inside the control arms. I also did not use the VB and P grease, never looked at it. I used Energy Suspension part number 9.11104, a very tenacious teflon based lubricant that is resistant to water. I believe that this is what Dick Guldstrand refers to as 'monkey grease'. It works very well and there are no squeaks after more than a thousand miles.

I hope that this will be of help to those of you who are interested in this modification. The job wasn't very difficult and can be done in about six hours at an easy pace working on jack stands. If you are in my area I will help you with the pressing if I can. Have fun.
Wow! Thank you Dave for sharing it here. And I hope that you can also help me. I will keep in touch with you.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top