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I just read through the new issue of Vette Magazine and found a very interesting tip in the article where they install an Exedy dual disk clutch.

They show how the stock clutch line feeding into the slave has an orifice restricition to slow down the clutch engagement to "reduce driveline shock".

The fix was to remove the feedline from the slave, and drill out the restriciton.

Sounds like not doing it could be the root cause of many preamature clutch failures I've been reading about.

Is anyone performing this mod ? Looks Like a must do for my Exedy install.
 

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Arnoldir said:
I just read through the new issue of Vette Magazine and found a very interesting tip in the article where they install an Exedy dual disk clutch.

They show how the stock clutch line feeding into the slave has an orifice restricition to slow down the clutch engagement to "reduce driveline shock".

The fix was to remove the feedline from the slave, and drill out the restriciton.

Sounds like not doing it could be the root cause of many preamature clutch failures I've been reading about.

Is anyone performing this mod ? Looks Like a must do for my Exedy install.
Why not just drop a Mcleod master in and not bother with drilling anything?
 

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Hey ScDFACE,

The article states that the restriction is in the feed line where it attaches to the slave. Changing master cyl would have no effect.
 

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Haven't done this on a Vette yet but we have done this on several Camaro's and Firebird's. Their problem was a slow clutch return when charging through the gears. The pedal just keeps staying lower and lower to the floor when going through the gears in haste. Drilling out the feedline stopped the problem.

Later ... Larry S.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the feedback Larry.

Anyone else know anything about this ??

I'd have thought with all the fried clutches lately this topic would have gotten more play.
 

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Arnoldir said:
I'd have thought with all the fried clutches lately this topic would have gotten more play.
There has been a lot of controversy on the cause of the clutch pedal sticking to the floor.

At first, it was thought that this restriction point in the fluid like was the cause, but later down the road I think it boiled down to air getting in the system due to mis-torqued clutch which caused undue wobble on the throw-out bearing seal area and air would get in the system.

If you do a search for ' sticking clutch pedal ' you will find a ton of threads.

Here's a few results ... you be the judge,

http://www.z06vette.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28824&highlight=sticking+clutch+pedal

http://www.z06vette.com/forums/showthread.php?t=74614&highlight=sticking+clutch+pedal

http://www.z06vette.com/forums/showthread.php?t=69436&highlight=sticking+clutch+pedal

http://www.z06vette.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60432&highlight=sticking+clutch+pedal

That's just the tip of the iceberg! :crazy:

Here's a quote from the last link:

"The source of the problem is an incorrectly torqued pressure plate.

Under load it produces unequal contact with the flywheel.

When this happens excess heat is generated which causes the fluid to heat and also the slave is misaligned which also causes more excess heat and air to leak in past the seals.

Once the pressure plate and flywheel wear, out of alignment, retorqueing the bolts correctly or simply bleeding the slave will not cure the problem. They are damaged goods and will never work correctly.

The fix is to replace the flywheel, pressure plate, clutch pack, throw out and slave cylinder.

The reason some dealers deny the claim is due to excess milage and abuse (racing) or the fact that they cannot reproduce it on a cold car.

You need to present it to them with the clutch pedal sticking and the car and fluid hot. Remember that the computer stores 5 minutes of data so don't take it in after doing burn outs to 125 MPH. Just warm up the clutch and keep it hot and present it to the service writer with the pedal on the floor. And have a copy of the TSB reference number on hand."
 

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I was also under the impression that the clutch line obstruction wasn't a Vette issue, but I have never read anything that I would really call conclusive either way, so who knows. Probably wouldn't hurt your clutch, but what about the driveline? Take the problem and move it from the clutch to the tranny/diff? Not sure which is worse. :eek:
 
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