Corvette Z06 Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am not supposed to punch it until the car warms up, right? So my questions are:

1) At what engine temperature is the engine warmed up enough where it is ok to punch it?
2) Before the engine is warmed up, how do you drive it? What is a safe RPM to stay under? Can you go half throttle? Quarter throttle?

In my 99 coupe, I am sure that I punched it pretty hard before letting it warm up and I never saw any problems. My guess is that this is being extra safe with the car but I would like to know.

Thanks.

- Charley
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,626 Posts
I'm very anal about this. I won't take off until I've let it idle for at least a couple of minutes .. longer in winter. I drive it very gently (normally) until the oil temp starts to heat up, and I won't push it really hard until the oil temp's 180+. I'll probably get a few flames over this, but my belief is that until the engine's at or near full operating temp, it just shouldn't be pushed to its limits.

IMHO the most important part of this is the first 30 seconds after you start the car. I've known some people who'll start the car, gun it like crazy a few times, throw it in gear and take off. I've always heard that 90% of engine wear occurs in the first 30 seconds after starting the car, and before the oil is flowing freely through the system. (Rant .. I don't know why automakers haven't built pre-oilers into all new cars ... planned obsolence, maybe?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Coolant to 180, and you are fine

Hi there,
Once your coolant gets to 180 or there abouts, you can drive normally.
You are really concerned only with expansion rates in the cylinder bores, for you type of concern. As Jerry has said, your first 30 seconds are the worst, as oil has to flow, but once your oil has dispersed through your engine, you will be fine, and you dont have to worry about babying it, you will be fine.
Besttoyou, c4c5
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
The funny thing about expansion of pistons in the bores.. These aren't (unfortunately) forged pistons. Forged pistons require more cold piston to bore clearance (because they expand more) and tend to slap around and make noise when cold.

On top of that, the bore clearance was reduced significantly for 2002 and the pistons coated.

So the bores, even when cold, are really tight.

Not trying to change anyone's opinion or even suggest that you shouldn't warm it up.. It just seems less necessary with modern engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,321 Posts
LS1/LS6 motors seem to run better with a little heat in them. Ice cold motors actually seem to run slower than one that has some heat in it.

My personal preference is that the oil be to 150 before I go drive the car hard. This is not always possible when pushing the car at the drag strip, but on the street I think it is entirely reasonable.

It is imporant that your fluids be up to the correct operating temperature. Does that mean your motor will blow up if you don't, no. But it does lead to some accelerated wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
You can start it and drive normal. That's normal for a sedan, not normal for a Z! If you want the motor to last follow this: temp down revs down. Personally, I wouldn't take it above 2.5-3K RPM until you get the *oil* temp above 150F. I wouldn't take it above 4K until the *oil* temp is up in 180F+ range. Remember the aluminum block will heat up much sooner than that oil. Oil lubes best when its hot. A lubed motor will run stronger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,096 Posts
A lot of good info here gang!

I have been a Senior Engineering Technician at Detroit Diesel for many years, and have performed hundreds of engine tests thru the years. The test procedures are always spelled out in detail by the Engineers. We monitor numerous parameters in our testing. Examples: individual exhaust temps at each exhaust manifold inlet, turbocharger inlet and outlet temps, air inlet temps, inlet manifold temps, oil gallery temps, oil sump temps, oil temps in and out of the turbo, cylinder liner temps (some cases we monitor each cylinder liner in 24 different locations!) exhaust manifiod outlet temps, coolant temps in & out at the water pump, thermostat housing inlet & outlet temps, fuel in & out at the fuel pump, ditto for pressure in these locations.....Ok, you get the picture. We do NOT start recording engine data until EVERYTHING is up to full operating temperatures, and we typically do not go to WOT until the oil is fully warmed up.

Message: Good advice for our gasoline engines too!

Zippy :z: :z:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,096 Posts
Brian:

I am not sure what you mean by acoustic signature testing....please explain. If you mean engine noise tests, then yes, we do,

Being a major engine manufacturer, we have strict federal regulations for emissions, noise, soot, etc.

Our major customers are Freightliner, Kenworth, Peterbilt, Navistar, Western Star, etc in the truck market. We also provide engines for bus manufacturers, construction, industrial, work & pleasure boats, off-road, agriculture, mining, generator sets, etc.

Zippy :z: :z:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all of the details guys. :)

- Charley
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
Don't Forget...

that if you just let the engine get up to operating temps idling in your garage or driveway, that the tranny and gear fluid are not up to temp (they will get some heat from the exhaust on a C5 though.) So I try not to let the car just idle to warm up. I go driving and warm all the fluids and moving parts up together. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
For me, EZ driving, no idling, until oil above 150F....then hammer time
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
One theory I have heard (not claiming it's "right" or anything like that), is that it's better to warm up the car with light driving than with idling in place. That theory holds that idling is a fairly severe engine operating mode, and it takes longer for the engine to warm up that way, whereas driving with low throttle settings is a less severe operating mode for the engine and also lets it warm up faster.

<shrug> I dunno what to believe sometimes :) I tend to warm up the car by light driving, but I don't shift over 2K until the engine oil reaches 160F or so. It's definately nice to have that display on the DIC.

But that reminds me of something I wish the car had. Since we have a "throttle by wire" system, seems like they could have a mode which electronically limited the car to a certain RPM until the engine was properly warmed up (well, you couldn't control downshifts I guess, but it would still help). I always warm the car up when I drive, but I worry about how the car is treated if I take it to have service work done, or window tint installed, or whatever else. With my old firebird, I sometimes noticed 7 or 8 more miles on the car when I got it back from almost _any_ type of service. And I'm sure that those people don't take the time to let the engine warm up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
novetteyet,

I do exactly the same thing and my car is very happy!

Cold oil doesn't flow as well as warm. Your oil pressure may be high, but the oil isn't getting through the engine very fast.

My .02,

2k :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,442 Posts
Pre oiler

Any available for the ZO6 that would be the way to go. Oil flowing before the rings rub the walls.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top