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How much do you guys think it will cost to make this motor blower friendly? It cost about 3000 dollars around here (Cali) to forge an 03 Z motor. Just wondering how much you guys think it will cost to make the new Z handle boost safely.
 

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Well the crank IS forged and the main caps are billet which are improvements over the LS6.

The pistons would need to be replaced with forged units.

They also improved the rod bolts.

The only part that is left in question are the new Titanuim rods. Are they stronger than the powdered metal LS6 rods. Are they forged or billet ?? Can they withstand forced induction pressures. I suspect they will be able to.

You may only have to replace the pistons.

I would still use all studs in the block for better clamping uniformity.
 

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DJWorm said:
Well the crank IS forged and the main caps are billet which are improvements over the LS6.

The pistons would need to be replaced with forged units.

They also improved the rod bolts.

The only part that is left in question are the new Titanuim rods. Are they stronger than the powdered metal LS6 rods. Are they forged or billet ?? Can they withstand forced induction pressures. I suspect they will be able to.

You may only have to replace the pistons.

I would still use all studs in the block for better clamping uniformity.
DJ is right. The pistons and pins would be the weakest link in the chain. The titanuim rods are a unknown at this point. I would hope they be more beefy the stock C5 PM rods.

D.J.
 

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How are connecting rods affected by supercharging? I can understand the need to replace pistons because they are directly exposed to increased combustion pressures. Would this same pressure act on the exhaust valves and their rods?
 

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The forces developed in the cylinder during the power stroke are transferred to the crank through the connecting rod. This means the rod sees the same force as the piston. If you're making a lot of additional power, you need to have beefier rods to handle it.

Boosted applications can run hotter. But you don't usually need to replace valves.
 

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Any specific beef about the Ti rods, or just that they are unproven?

Rebuilding my son's Cobra, I noted Ti rod options at 795 a rod... Too much for me, but for those kinds of $, I would expect only positives.

I know Ti alloys have superior strength to weight over typical forged internals (on paper), but low grade Ti can be more susceptible to fatigue failures, so I guess you are right... We will just have to see how these rods hold up over time.
 

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Ti reduces the weight for a given strength. I would expect to be comparable to other stock rods...good for may maybe 7500rpm/650hp.

Beyond that I would use beefier pieces. Racing rods are sold by strength (spec'd in hp/rpm/type of use-oval vs. drag, dimensions (length, pin, journal dia and width, and weight). The trade off is in strength vs weight vs. price.
 

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RocketSled said:
If you're making a lot of additional power, you need to have beefier rods to handle it.
This is not necessarily true.

Rods typically fail under tensile loading, not compressive. A rod's biggest load is at max RPM with the piston racing up the bore and coming to a screeching halt at TDC on the exhaust stroke since the exhaust valve is open, allowing pressure to escape. It is here where max tensile loading occurs since only the rod is keeping the piston from flying through the head, unlike the compression stroke where both valves are closed which provides a compressive load on the piston, attempting to slow it down.

With that said, a more appropriate statement would be:

"If you're spinning higher than factory redline, you need to have beefier rods to handle it."

Otherwise, if you stick with the factory redline, the factory rods will be good-to-go.

DJWorm said:
You may only have to replace the pistons.
Agreed. Knowing your target horsepower will determine the amount of boost required, which in turn determines the compression ratio/pistons to run.

I would still use all studs in the block for better clamping uniformity.
Without a doubt. :cheers:
 
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