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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will the front calipers work on the rear? I think those wimpy rear
calipers are pretty cheesy looking:( :cheers:
 

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I've been thinking the same, but nontheless I'm TOTALLY impressed with the braking ability out of my '02 with stock pads. I've got 5700 miles and 2 HARD track days on them and they have at least 75% left. I added DRM front brake ducts, SS brake lines and Motul 600 fluid. I keep boiling the fluid, but no brake fade yet. I'm going to try some Hawk Blues next time on the track. I would like to put bigger calipers on the back, but not sure if that wouldn't throw off the nice smooth braking that I already have.

I know the GS and ZR1 guys had kits to put the front calipers on the back and the lobster claws on the front (two calipers on each side of the front.) Those looked badass!!!
 

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What would you hope to accomplish by that?? Appearance?

I don't know the piston area of the C5 setup. If it is like any other vehicle, the system is balanced via different piston area front/rear.

You would need larger bore front calipers to balance the change. A prop valve can't fix this.
 

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I had 96' Vette front calipers on the rear of my 2000 convertible. A company called A/O Engineering in Florida offers a kit, contact Nate he knows about it. :)
 

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fyrcaptain said:
Will the front calipers work on the rear? I think those wimpy rear
calipers are pretty cheesy looking:( :cheers:

They sure do fit--everything works great as long as you install a adjustable proportioning valve in the line.BUT you donot have a parking brake.
 

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They sure do fit--everything works great as long as you install a adjustable proportioning valve in the line.
The prop valve is merely a peak pressure regulator. It limits peak pressure, but it does not adjust or regulate fluid volume. The prop valves are useful, but they are far from a complete solution.

You would tend to most notice that limitation when trail braking, where pressures are low and the prop valve does nothing to correct the new hydraulic balance.

A 'real' balance setup (as on a race car) uses dual master cylinders with an adjustable balance bar. The balance bar works across the entire pressure range. And with front and rear MC's, you can swap one of the MCs to change the bore size and correct for changes in the front or rear caliper piston area.

Anyone know the piston area of the stock calipers and MC?

BUT you donot have a parking brake.
Don't you mean 'emergency brake'?? ;)

I believe Rippie offers stainless pistons to replace the stock aluminum pistons. Not sure why they didn't put stainless in at the factory..

ZO SIC, are you getting any air out of your rear brakes when you bleed'em??
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yep, just looks!

BrianK said:
What would you hope to accomplish by that?? Appearance?
That's it Brian just looks. But if it's not a plug-n-play mod I don't think I would go the way of a proportioning valve etc......
I do admit the 02 has some great stock grippers, but that rear caliper..... what was Dave and the boys thinking on that one:puke:
Thanks for all the info brothers:) :cheers:
 

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Be patient.. A good friend of mine is a brake development engineer. We're going to see what it will take to put the big rotors on with stock calipers for fairly low $$.
 

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Hard to tell if I am getting air out of the rear brakes or not. I have speed bleeders and bleed them myself. I put brand new honey colored Motul 600 fluid in the car and then take the car to the track the next day, then bleed when I get home and all the brake fluid is then blackish grey. Even my clutch fluid is blackish grey and watered down looking. I only have trouble grabbing 4th gear when the tranny is very hot. No trouble of the clutch staying on the floor for 3d gear.
 

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Hard to tell if I am getting air out of the rear brakes or not. I have speed bleeders and bleed them myself.
I see. Does your pedal get mushy during the event?

I recently read that the C5 clutch doesn't take brake fluid and that GM uses something else. That surprised me. Anyone know about that?

I'm still pretty surprised at how much that clutch fluid gets beat up on the Z.
 

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Does the pedel get mushy? Do little kids and small animals run in fear when you drive by in your Z06? :) Hell yeah it gets mushy. Downright nasty in fact. It is nearly on the floor. My last few laps around the track I had to floor the brakes to activate the ABS so it would kick the pedal back and give me some pressure. I'm surprised that this Motul 600 is turning blackish/grey in one day though...

As for the clutch fluid... I don't know what they would use. What else could they use? It is "hydrolic fluid" right? I'm going to suck most all of the blackish/grey clutch fluid out and put some Motul 600 in and bleed the system. See if it keeps the honey color and allow me to grab 4th on the RR course.

But I still need to swap the trans and diff fluid.
 

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ZO SIC, given that your pedal is getting so mushy, I wonder if you shouldn't try changing pad compounds? I know you're getting great wear and no fade, but a race pad may have better thermal characteristics. Also, having to apply less force to the pad means it will pull less heat out of the rotor

I've always run the Performance Friction pads on my track car (either 90's all around or 93's on front, 90's in rear). The 83's or 93's are what most all of the CART and TRANS-AM cars run.

I wouldn't use the 93's on the street. They tend to wear faster at low temps.

I have not tried the Hawks.

Has anyone with mushy pedal issues tried the stainless pistons?
 
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