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Ok, I replaced my rears the other day and now the back end seems to want to step out a little sooner than before. Is this normal for new tires to be a little less sticky new than when worn??

Just a little background info. to help answer the question. I replaced the rears because I had a chuck taken out on one tire (from a curb on a too tight corner) and the other had two nails in it. The tire guy said I had about 20% to 30% left. This is my first tire change on the Z so I have no prior experience to compare and when the car was new I was much easier on it than I am now. I did check and match the tire pressure at 30 PSI cold (the same as before the change) so I know that isn't it.

I was thinking that because there is more tread on the tires that that would give it a slightly higher CG and allow it to start to slide sooner. I even tried a long burn out to try to get anything that may have been on the tire off. They still stick good but the limit is definiately a little less than before the change.

Ok you tire experts please give me your thoughts.
 

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The Goodyear web site indicates that the GYF1SC tires come 8/32nd in as opposed to the more common 10/32 in so that the GY tires come from the factory ready for max traction.
 

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I haven't replaced my F1's yet, but my past experience with running sticky (A008RS and A032R) tires on my Porsche was that the tires as new are slippery as snot. This is caused by the mold release compound on the surface of the tire. IMHO, the only new tire that is not slippery when new is one that has had the treads shaved down to a reduced thickness for road racing.

Though the tread groove thickness of the F1SC is reduced from other road tires, I believe the tire is molded that way, not shaved.

The problem is much more noticeable when you replace either the front 2 or back 2 leaving tires with good traction on the other end.

200 miles of regular road use should cure the problem.
 

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All new tires are slick when new. As mentioned above the release agent is one cause, and the fact that the rubber hasn't been 'roughed up' some by wear. Just take it easy for awhile until the tires break in :D.
 
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