Corvette Z06 Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey All,
My builder had a problem with the concrete in my garage (poured when it was too wet). The top coat flaked in places so they had to go back and patch spots of it. Intitially the builder had said he was going to use an epoxy to cover it, but now he is saying that the floor will have to be cracked up and re poured. I am worried that they will do more harm than good to the walls, etc..

I remembered that someone here had posted some pictures of a garage floor tile that interlocks, it looked great. I called sears and they carry a system like this in black and red tiles. Please post up your experiences. The quote for materials is $1500 for 550 square feet. I need to know something fairly quickly so I can advise the builder as to what I want done.

Post Pictures and impressions if you have them.

Thanks for your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
If the floor is seperated from the wall with expansion joint, I'd have him redo it (at his expense). Isn't your fault they didn't know what they were doing. It shouldn't hurt the walls, and I would bet the second time they get it right. If it were a monolith slab pour, I'd opt for a floor tile system, or have them do a 2" overlay of concrete. We did that many times on some large projects.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Vettitude said:
If the floor is seperated from the wall with expansion joint, I'd have him redo it (at his expense). Isn't your fault they didn't know what they were doing. It shouldn't hurt the walls, and I would bet the second time they get it right. If it were a monolith slab pour, I'd opt for a floor tile system, or have them do a 2" overlay of concrete. We did that many times on some large projects.
Unfourtunately there is no expansion joint anywhere to be seen, it was poured in one big slab. I am sure that there is no structural damage, just cosmetic. I just dont have a lot of faith in them coming in to re-do it. I think tile might be the way to go. Sounds like you are pretty educated on the subject though, please post up what you think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,747 Posts
I don't have it, but have seen these floors at shows. They look interesting. My concern has always been jackstands and floor jacks. The ones I have seen have a diamond plate to them, and it seems that could interfear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
NO NO NO!!!! NO 2" overlay!!! Especially in VA. Texas.....maybe with fiber.

Make him tear it up. Start in the center and work outwards. Concrete should not have bonded to the wall THAT well. There SHOULD be expansion joint aound the perimeter at least.

If you cover it over, you'll kick yourself in the ass later.



-Tony
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
10,998 Posts
I sent you a PM with a URL for a cheaper tile from a non supporting vendor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,046 Posts
holedgr said:
NO NO NO!!!! NO 2" overlay!!! Especially in VA. Texas.....maybe with fiber.

Make him tear it up. Start in the center and work outwards. Concrete should not have bonded to the wall THAT well. There SHOULD be expansion joint aound the perimeter at least.

If you cover it over, you'll kick yourself in the ass later.
-Tony
While no where near the expert on this that Tony is, I fully agree with him. You need to get this right now on his dime or you will regret it latter. Good Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
As long as it it not costing you anything i did say let him re-do it at his cost. I am sure the 2nd time around they will get it right. Also if i were you i will start taking pictures and document things just incase in the feature this happens again you will have something to nail them in court.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
515 Posts
You should have some expansion joints in that slab including the perimiter. The floor will crack any way but why do such a poor job when it can be done properly for the same money spent?
The joints will help if he understands what he is doing. It sounds like you are in for more problems if you do not start over. He is the employee make him work to your standards!
Do it right or do not do it at all! :mah: :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Done properly, with a good bonding sealer and a high strength design mix, a 2"-3" overlay on an interior floor will last many years. If it's a mono slab full of rebar, it isn't worth tearing it up either from the inside out, or outside in. As a superintendent for a major construction company in Denver, we did many large infills on old elevator shafts, stair shafts etc, and poured high strength overlays, they were as strong as any 3" sidewalk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
niphilli said:
I remembered that someone here had posted some pictures of a garage floor tile that interlocks, it looked great. I called sears and they carry a system like this in black and red tiles. Please post up your experiences. The quote for materials is $1500 for 550 square feet. I need to know something fairly quickly so I can advise the builder as to what I want done.

Post Pictures and impressions if you have them.

Thanks for your help.
I used a product called Race Deck and am very pleased with it. It is supposed to be impervious to water, oil, gas, etc. Here's one picture looking into the garage, and close up from inside.

I highly recommend it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I am thinking very seriously about going with a floor like racedeck or the similar product that sears sells.

CONSTRUCTION FOLKES:
Please forgive me as I made a mistake in my original post. THe concrete was actually poured when it was too cold instead of too wet. During construction the floor did get some water on it and it got below 32 deg. THis cracked the top coat in some places. TO rectify theis they cracked up these spots and used thinset to fill the holes. NOw it does not match of course and you can see where it has been patched.

I *THink* that the problem is purely cosmetic and not structural, but I got them to write an addendum to my contract that they would fix this and warranty the foundation from structural defect for 5 years. This is a monolith slab that we are talking about and bottom line I do not have a lot of faith in the subcontractor who poured the concrete coming back to fix this problem without creating more problems. What would your reccomendation be? I am thinking to go with a modular floor like racedeck then having it inspected by an engineer in a couple of years to make sure that the foundation is sound.

Thanks,
-NIck
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top