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I was extatic as the DHL guy walked up to my door with the box containing my T1 sway bars. All excited I opened the box to see the beautiful fat blue bars inside. After getting through all the insulators and bushings, I noticed there were no frickin' instructions inside. :bs: Does anyone have a link or anything that could help me out here? :mah: I am dying to put these in tomorrow. :flaming:
 

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T1 Sway bar installation

For a basic mechanic the installation is straight forward. However there are some "pearls" to be aware of before hand that will make the installation easier.

1. The hardest part is removing the OEM end links. You need a correct Torx to hold the center stud.

2. NOTE: The OEM end links do not fit the T1 bars. The T1 end link bolt has a larger OD and therefore the mounting hole in the T1 bar is larger ID. You MUST use the T1 hemi jointed spherical bearing end links. (Conversely, you can not use T1 end links with the OEM bar unless you drill out the mounting hole to the larger ID.)
3. There are 2 flavors of hemi jointed sperical end links. The better ones have Teflon lined bearings. The Teflon lined ones are quieter and require less maintainance.
4. The length of the OEM endlinks are 3 1/4". In contrast, the MINIMUM length of the T1 end links is 3 1/2". The T1 end links should be first installed at their minimum 3 1/2" and adjusted longer, later, if necessary.
5. To get the endlinks initially exactly equal, adjust both together, mounted on bolts and measure. Then snug down the adjusters.
6. Myths abound about installing the bars with the wheels on the ground OR off the ground. It doesn't matter except that BOTH wheels should be either ON or OFF the ground. If OFF the ground equal length jack stands, positioned equally, MUST be used and the surface should be level in both cases.
7. Post installation the end links require at least weekly maintainance consisting of wiping off any road debri and 1 drop of oil per bearing for non teflon bearings.

8. Since the T1 bars are larger in OD they require larger ID and hence OD mounting bushings. There are larger T1 mounting brackets available. However the OEM brackets can be used IF they are shimmed. To shim, each must have 3-4 large Stainless Steel fender washers placed. This allows the OEM brackets to standoff a bit so as not to crush the larger T1 bushings. Otherwise the correct torque on the mounting bolts will allow an unshimmed OEM bracket to crush a T1 bushing and bind the rotation of the bar.
9. The bushings have a webbed internal surface that MUST be lubricated with either a silicon or lithium grease. These require periodic maintainance (additional grease) as well. Probably once or twice a year depending on use, dusty and/or wet conditions.
10. When installed in the mounting brackets & bushings, and before the end links are attatched, the bar MUST be able to be rotated along its axsis, easily by hand.

11. ALL bolts and nuts must be torqued correctly. They should all be double checked at installation. The torque values should be rechecked after the first use or at least within 1 week.
 

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Rigid articulating spherical bearing rod ends ( RASBRE) were originally called Heim joints in the US after they were discovered by the British on crashed German ME 109. (The ME 109's also had the first documented use of Nitrous Oxide boost).

The H.G. Heim Co. was granted the US patent and selected by the Pentagon to manufacture them for US aircraft. During that time they were referred to as Heim joints, in the US.

After the patent ran out and others in the US and Japan such as Superior and Aurora started manufacturing them, (there are over 15 manufacturers today) other names were used. This was done so as not to refer to their old original competitior, H.G. Heim, and avoid any trademark infringement which lasted longer than the patent rights did. Ie the new manufacturers could make Heim joints...they just couldn't call them Heim joints.

In Europe, they were never called Heim joints; so other terms evolved, namely:
Hemi joints
Hemi-jointed spherical bearings

Not to be confused with a Chrysler's hemispherical combustion chamber, or "Hemi"; the term Heim joint and hemi-jointed sperical bearing are used synonomously.

And quite frankly, the Heim joints of the late 1940's are only similar to todays exotic, close tolerance, teflon lined, rare metal, hemi-jointed spherical bearings.
 
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