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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all....

well, I got another code a P0410, and P1416 3 weeks ago.... so i got a problem for sure. I think it might be the check valve on the B side (what a pain to change that being behind the intake and all)... but I might suspect that the air pump might be fried. I have been driving in a lot of rain the past few weeks, and maybe some water got into the air pump area and fried it. My car is stock.

...secondary system. I did a lot of searches...and well, i want to inspect the air pump. I know it is located in the front fender driver side area, but how can i actually have access to it. Do i have to remove some panels or something? Is it easy to do?


thanks for any additional help
 

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The secondary air system or "A.I.R" system (Air Injection Reaction) introduces air into the exhaust during and shortly after cold startup in order to lower emissions during this period. Injecting air into the exhaust results in a leaner mixture which causes the catalytic converters to come up to temperature sooner than would otherwise be possible. Hence the name Air Injection Reaction, as it promotes a more rapid catalytic reaction.

Although this system only operates for a couple minutes after a every cold start it also operates for a brief time as a functional test at some point during every three ignition cycles, usually while driving.

The system mainly consists of an air pump located inside the front fascia on the drivers side, associated plumbing and hoses, solenoid valves and two check valves. These two check valves prevent hot exhaust gases from damaging the air pump and associated components.

If you look in the engine compartment on the drivers side you can see one of the check valves easily. With the addition of aftermarket headers it is not uncommon for one or both of these check valves to become damaged due to heat. Often it is the passenger side check valve, which is not easily visible, and requires a more involved procedure to replace as it's located behind the engine, near the firewall.

The pump itself can also fail due to contamination, such as from water injestion. It's air inlet is located on the intake shroud next to the air box. This inlet is frequently relocated and/or modified as part of an aftermarket intake system.
 

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You can access the pump by removing the panel underneath the car. It is the panel in front of the driver tire. The pump is held in place with 3 compression type rubber grommets. if it turns out to be the pump and you need a replacment PM me, I think I still have the one that I removed from my car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Remove a panel from underneath the car? Well, I can't do that in my garage, i have no space. My car is going on a lift tonight at GM for an alignment, i will have them check it out for me. I will keep you guys posted as to what was the problem, and how much $$$ its going to set me back....
 

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I had an SES light go off - can't remember exactly what code it was - but it was for the "secondary air system - bank two" or something like that. A friend of mine has an OBDII scan tool on his laptop. He read the code for me and told me he had the same one on his '98 SS Camaro a while back. Diagnosis? Change the check valve for the passenger side exhaust manifold - yeah, that's right, the one bolted to the BACK of the driver's side cylinder head.

While there's nothing too complicated about changing this valve, it is a major PITA. Basically what I ended up doing was unbolting the air pipe from the pass. side exhaust manifold, then (cursing and swearing) unbolted the bracket holding the air pipe to the driv. side cylinder head, and removing the whole pipe/valve assy. from the passenger side of the car. This took a while and was very frustrating as the bracket that holds the pipe to the head gets caught on EVERYTHING behind the motor on its way out.

Cost for the valve = CAN$30.00 (dealer price with GM discount)
1-1/2 hours of my time = FREE

Murphy's law states that the valve that was plugged was the more difficult of the two to replace.

If you look inside the valve you'll see that it's plugged up with all sorts of crap, and it either won't seal properly and leaks (as was the case with my buddie's Camaro) or it just plugs solid and won't flow either way (case with my Z).

Have fun!
 
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