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Alternative Corvette

  • ethanol

    Votes: 13 22.4%
  • natural gas

    Votes: 2 3.4%
  • propane

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • hydrogen

    Votes: 6 10.3%
  • biodiesel

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • electricity

    Votes: 4 6.9%
  • methanol

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • p-series fuels

    Votes: 1 1.7%
  • gasoline forever

    Votes: 32 55.2%

  • Total voters
    58
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
It seems that the auto industry is actually serious about alternative fuels. GM, for example, is offering flex fuel vehicles that can run on either E-85 ethanol or straight gasoline, depending on which one is cheaper at the pump at any given time. Other fuels include natural gas, propane, hydrogen, biodiesel, electricity, methanol, and p-series fuels.

I have to assume that alternative fuel technology will eventually find its way into high performance sports cars, although it’ll probably be the last vehicle segment to be addressed. Admittedly, it’s going to be quite a while before we see any changes, if ever.

Just out of curiosity, which of the alternative fuel technologies makes the most sense being integrated into a sports car? Or do you think that gasoline will ALWAYS be the best ingredient for performance?

==================================

I'm sure a performance car could run off of just about any of the fuels listed above, but it's just not a sports car unless it's burning gas. :D (IMO)
 

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I can't say I really know all that much about the other types of fuels. From what I understand, the "summer blend" of gasoline that is required in all gas stations will contain ethanol instead of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether). Here is an excerpt from this story at

http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2006/03/gas_ethanol.html

The new regulations require refiners to replace the gasoline additive MTBE with more costly ethanol. The additive transition is scheduled for summer and ethanol producers in the Midwest may have trouble transporting enough of the fuel to key markets along the East Coast on a timely basis, according to the report.

The Energy Department reports that the U.S. ethanol industry continues to show serious growing pains that could bring higher fuel prices as well as cause short supplies at the pump.

The refining industry claims to have pointed out the difficulty ethanol producers might encounter in offsetting the loss of MTBE, which accounts for about 10 percent of every gallon of gasoline.

There are transportation issues with ethanol as well. Gasoline can be shipped in large quantities through an extensive network of pipelines. Ethanol, however, corrodes pipelines and must be transported in trucks or other relatively small volume carriers to terminals where the fuel is blended into gasoline.
 

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I think a hybrid using elctric motors could make sense in a performance car. You can use the motors to capture energy otherwise waaster during braking, and use the high torque they develop for acceleration.
 

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Brazil has already gone totally Ethanol according to a story I saw on TV last night.They say thier cars run better on the E-85 than gas and it's $3 cheaper.
I see this happening here soon.Just like in the 80s when high octane Leaded gas disappeared.They started putting catalytic converters in cars in 73 and 15 yrs later there weren't enough old cars around to warrant selling leaded gas.You have to go to a race track or airfield to fill up a pre 72 big block car or suffer vapor lock.
Alternative fuels are going to be the next big change in transportation.First E-85,then onto Hydrogen.The technology is already there for hydrogen power,but the big job is putting in all the pumps and building the cars.
As far as sports cars and performance.Whatever fuel we are given we will find a way to race it and make it fast.My Z is fast enough on 97 octane Super-unleaded so I don't miss 110 octane leaded gas from the 70s.I read an article a while back about someone doing 200mph on the salt flats in a Hydrogen powered car.
 

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Hey!! How come I can't vote for fusion?

I want a 5 megawatt inertial confinement fusion plant under the hood.

Oh, sure, I admit there are minor engineering obstacles...
 

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novetteyet said:
Hey!! How come I can't vote for fusion?

I want a 5 megawatt inertial confinement fusion plant under the hood.

Oh, sure, I admit there are minor engineering obstacles...

He didn't include my favorite fuel either - nitroglycerine. You get a lot of bang for your buck. :eek2:
 

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Give me ethanol and a 30-40gal fuel cell. 118octane. Yum. I'll run 15:1.

Btw, ethanol from corn costs 1unit of energy for every 1.3units produced in ethanol. Ethanol from sugar cane (like brazil) nets out at about 8units of energy per 1 unit used to make it.
 

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I hear nitromethane works pretty well :D

Then there is always cold fusion :pp:
 

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vant said:
It seems that the auto industry is actually serious about alternative fuels. GM, for example, is offering flex fuel vehicles that can run on either E-85 ethanol or straight gasoline, depending on which one is cheaper at the pump at any given time. Other fuels include natural gas, propane, hydrogen, biodiesel, electricity, methanol, and p-series fuels.

I have to assume that alternative fuel technology will eventually find its way into high performance sports cars, although it’ll probably be the last vehicle segment to be addressed. Admittedly, it’s going to be quite a while before we see any changes, if ever.

Just out of curiosity, which of the alternative fuel technologies makes the most sense being integrated into a sports car? Or do you think that gasoline will ALWAYS be the best ingredient for performance?

==================================

I'm sure a performance car could run off of just about any of the fuels listed above, but it's just not a sports car unless it's burning gas. :D (IMO)

Check out this stuff:

http://www.himacresearch.com/

http://www.himacresearch.com/docs/geet.html

Oil companies and our governments HATE this cat.
 

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E85 would be nice. It's way cheapier than gas, at least right now. I think it's $2.58 a gal where i live. My buddy had a newer TT Mustang with over 900 rwhp that ran on E 85. It ran great on the street as well. I wish i could some how tune my car for E 85.
 

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Re: Alternative Fuels in a Corvette?

E85 would be nice. It's way cheapier than gas, at least right now. I think it's $2.58 a gal where i live. My buddy had a newer TT Mustang with over 900 rwhp that ran on E 85. It ran great on the street as well. I wish i could some how tune my car for E 85.
Does anyone know why we could not run E85 in our Vettes? I hear E85 is highly corrosive so u gotta remove metal in the fuel lines but other than that..why couldnt we do it with some tuning?
 

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Re: Alternative Fuels in a Corvette?

Surprisingly, most people, and those in this thread, assume the question is simply a price question. Which is cheaper...gas vs E85? I am very strongly of the opinion that this is very short sighted. Consider that virtually every nation exporting crude oil to us HATES us. It will become an issue of availability, not simply price. Consider what would happen to our economy if we got cut off again, similar to the situation in the 70's. Our economy would grind to a halt very quickly. The ridiculous "strategic oil reserve", if they haven't pissed it away like Slick Willy did in a vain attempt to mitigate gas prices (which is NOT why it was created), would last about 3 months max. Also think about how much fuel our military requires.

I would buy a flex fuel vehicle for 2 key reasons, especially a Vette.
1. I would love to send my money, at any price per gallon, to Americans who make ethanol, and stop sending my money to terrorist nations who use the money to kill us.
2. When we get cut off, and can't get enough gas, then ethanol is an alternative to keep us going.

Given that the direct manufacturing cost to build a flex fuel vehicle is only a few hundred dollars, I would require all cars sold in the US to be flex. This has several benefits. It creates demand for ethanol, which will increase its availability and lower its cost. It also creates a base of transportation that can continue if gas gets cut off (by political or military action). Given the incredible growing demand coming from nations such as China and India, and the growing competition for supply, there will be a war for energy supplies in the not distant future. Our country is doing nothing to prepare for this.

OK. Rant over. :drunken:
 
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