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Discussion Starter #1
What's the correct technique? I've attempted a few times in a 97 LT1 Camaro, but the results were inconsistent. Here's what I do: go fast in a straight line to get up to speed, around 80 or so, then make an quick turn, of course at that speed the tailend will swing out (oversteer), then as fast as you can, turn the steering wheel towards the side that the rear is sliding towards, and keep it locked , all this time keep the gas pedal fully depressed. Sometimes I was successful, others not. Did I do something wrong? Haven't had a chance to try it with the Z06 yet.

Thanks,
RT
 

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Powersliding is not something one *forces* the car to do. Its a function of high speed and *limited* traction.

Vettes (especially the Z) has super high traction so getting it into a power slide would require a WIDE open track and speeds in excess of 120 or so.

My friend would powerslide his Turbo Beetle at least once a day, but since his tires were so skinny, it was MUCH easier........

JC
 

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I should also add, if you really want to get the feel of it, I recommend buying some time at a local karting track, the racing ones.....you get get them sliding pretty good.........

JC
 

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I learned to drift the car at much lower speeds. I'll leave the 80 mph slides to Colin McRae and the rest of the World Rally Championship contenders. :) That said, it's a relatively simple technique at less than ballistic speeds. I learned in a Mustang Cobra, but the same things should work in any rear drive car with enough power.

First, understand this relationship: The more G's you are pulling in the turn, the less throttle you need to slide the car.

To start, turn into a corner at moderate speeds. When your car has almost completed the turn, get into the gas. (Again, the faster you are turning, the less gas you need.) If you are turning fast enough and you give the car enough gas, you should get the back end of the car to come around. Since you are at the corner exit, you will need to counter steer just a little bit.

Once I got comfortable with that, I started to apply the throttle earlier and earlier in the corner. The sooner you get on the gas, the more difficult it becomes to balance the throttle, steering and line.

When I really wanted to play, I would actually pump up my front tires to get the car to understeer MORE. I found that the more the car understeers in steady state cornering, the easier the car is to control in a power oversteer condition.

A few more bits of advice: Learn in the rain. I know that sounds stupid, but I find that slides are MUCH more progressive and easy to manage in the rain. You can also practice at much slower speeds.

Turn off the active handling and enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, I know it's slower around a corner. Just wanted to do it for fun. Thanks to all the tips, indeed I've found that the SC tires are very sticky on dry pavement, at reasonable speed that is. The LT1 Camaro I referred to had pretty worn tires.

RT
 

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A rather important point that I forgot to mention.

Eventually, you will screw up. In my case, I was turning left under an underpass. Second gear, 30 mph, probably no more that .5G or so. I figured that I had three lanes to play with on the access road, so I gave it quite a bit of throttle.

The back end comes around REALLY quickly. (I had just gotten the tires Armor All-ed, and the attendants had managed to armor all the outside treadblocks to boot.) I was staring right at the freeway embankment at about 45 degrees to my direction of travel. I cranked in a ton of countersteer, and then the car got traction and began to hook slide. At that point, the steering was so far to the right, that I couldn't unwind it fast enough to catch the secondary slide.

I ended up sliding at least 25 YARDS, spinning almost 270 degrees in the secondary slide, and completely out of control. Did I mention that the ABS brakes don't really do much while your car is spinning? Since half of my wheels are turning forward, and half my wheels were spinning backwards, I think the ABS got confused and gave me nothing. (All I wanted to do was lock everything up and slow the thing down.) The car came to a rest pointed the wrong direction, and luckily, my left rear wheel just barely kissed the curb. No damage other than a slightly scraped rim.

After that, I quit practicing on the street and started autocrossing. Live and learn.
 

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:D If you REALLY want to learn about power sliding in the turns, may I suggest buying a sport type 4 wheeler and take it out to the country for some fast trail riding. By the end of the day, you will a.) have your fill of power sliding and more importantly b.) you will be an expert at the technique and actually give others advice on how to do it. Bill :cheers:
 

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The best "drift".....

and that IS the correct term... was

The old Sunoco commercial with Mark Donahue driving the Penske dark blue Sunoco '68 Camaro. The camera was pointing down a long straight with the heat shimmering off the road. You heard him coming... and coming ...and coming. Gearing up thru the Carousel ... a quick blurp entering the corner...louder...louder....louder.... then he appears .....
entering the straight from a right hander all four wheels drifting with counter steer.... A quick snap as he straightens out then up through the rest of the gears as he blows past you and the wax falls out of your ears!!!!!

Ahh..... the sound of those A Prod Big Blocks and Can AM cars...

Uhh...what did you say.... speak up?

That's right....you could actually feel those cars before you could see them!

BTW Sunoco revived a clip of that commercial and included it in a recent ad I saw last year... I haven't seen it since. I almost cried when I saw it.
 

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Rapid Transit,

Don't try that maneuver at 80MPH, you'll most likely total you and your car. :(

Of course you need to turn active handling off to get the Z into a powerslide. After that it is just a matter of applying "too much" throttle in the turn to break the back end loose, and counter steering when the back end starts to come around. The harder you bank into the turn and the more you "over apply" the throttle, the faster the back end will come around.

Try playing around on some slow speed (15-25mph) 90 degree turns first to learn the balance of the car. *You need to find someplace safe to do this*. Vettes tend to come around rather quickly when the rear end breaks loose. If you don't have a feel for the balance of the car, you could end up doing a complete 180 or worse.

Also be careful when you back off the throttle in a slide; Vettes also tend to re-hook up as quickly as they break loose. If your still counter steering when it hooks back up, you'll be pointing the car in the wrong direction!

Warning, the Vette is not the easiest car to control in a powerslide! The F-body's are easier to control because they carry more weight up front. The more weight a car carriers in back, the faster the rear end will come around when it gets loose. The B-body is a powersliders dream. Don't ever try to powerslide a mid/rear engine car :eek: .

Have fun, but be smart!
:cheers:

Oh yeah, also remember that your gear selection has a big impact on the powerslide as well. In first gear you have roughly 3 times more torque to the rear wheels than you do in fourth gear. In first gear cornering, you've got so much torque that you can pretty much break the rear end loose at will in any situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the warnings! I attempted this with the Camaro on an autox course after the event was finished. I'd NEVER try it on a public street/highway, so don't worry.

RT
 

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While I happen to notice that you live in an area with no snow, it would be far easier and less hard on whatever equipment you use to do it, in snow or ice. This will let you focus on the dynamics much more and you can accomplish all the needed moves at lower speeds, much less forces and at much less danger, I might add. In the case of the Vette, the forces that gives it soooooo much traction in the dry is of significant disadvantage, ie works against massive traction in the rain snow and ice (in order of most to least traction).
 
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