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I was reading on www.corvetteforum.com that folks were having trouble with the Russel SS brake lines and the wheel speed sensors freaking out. But the guys with the Goodridge lines said they didn't have any trouble. I have some Russel SS lines here waiting to go on, but I'm thinking I ought to buy some Goodridges instead. How about it folks, do you have Russel SS lines and no trouble?

And I also can't seem to find the part number for the speed bleeders, anybody have them? I have them on my '96 Z-28 and they work great. 5 minutes to bleed all 4 brakes on the car with the wheels still on the car :)
 

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I had Russell lines on my convertible for 2 years and never had a problem, I have Goodridge lines for the Z06 that I am installing this week, most of the problems that I have read about is due to improper bleeding of the brakes.
 

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Goodridges are ....

....the better choice. I would use them if my class allowed me to (sic).

Goodridge's are made for racing and are used by a lot of F1 teams. These are one of the few parts they don't manufacture themselves and outsource.

Some tips when installing any SS line.

1. Blow out all lines and connectors before installation. I have found a line partially occluded and a couple of connectors that were totally occluded either from a manufacturing defect (non Goodridge) and an insect taking up residence therein.

2. After initial drain, fill and bleed and if after new pads are burnished in, heat the system up using at least 3 panic stops from 80 to 20 MPH

3. Being careful, rebleed the hot system, using the proper bleed technique.
A. Half pressure on the pedal. (you need an assistant). Reapply for each wheel.
B. Use proper sequence ie LF/RF/LR/RR I then reverse sequence RR/LR/RF/LF to double check and be sure.
C. Refill and top off the master reservoir during the procedure. NOTE: You can not properly bleed all four wheels on 1 full reservoir. DO NOT let the reservoir run dry during the bleed procedure.
D. I use a rubber mallet to bang each caliper before and during each bleed. Helps get the air out.

4. Use a good brake fluid with the highest Dry AND Wet Boiling Point you can afford. I personnally think the Wet Point is more important. (I just posted my research on another thread, "Tools required to change brake pads") I personally like AP600.

5. Make sure the fluid is compatable with the car. Far example Castrol SRF is considered to be the best (and most expensive at $70.00/Liter) but is very corrosive and will , I am told eat away the seals in the system. If you use it you will be replacing the master cylinder and possibly the ABS in a season.

6. Do not mix brake fluids. ( I don't care what the label might say about compatability with other fluids.) At the very least you may degrade the Dry and Wet Boiling Points and that's what your paying for. That's why your upgrading the system with new pads @ $300, new lines @ $99, cryo'd rotors @ $135. Why scimp on a $15 pint of fluid?? Makes no sense.

7. On the initial fill and bleed with new fluid, bleed the ABS as well.
The ABS does not drain with the main system and you must use a Tech II analyser/computer to activate it. Your Chevy Dealer or a good brake shop will have one. This puts the correct fluid in the ABS as well and keeps the new fluid from being contaminated when the ABS is activated.

8. Bleed the brakes BEFORE each event and at least AFTER each event. I sometimes try to bleed between runs if I have time and if its a multiple day event at the end of each day.
 

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Goodridges are ....

....the better choice. I would use them if my class allowed me to (sic).

Goodridge's are made for racing and are used by a lot of F1 teams. These are one of the few parts they don't manufacture themselves and outsource.

Some tips when installing any SS line.

1. Blow out all lines and connectors before installation. I have found a line partially occluded and a couple of connectors that were totally occluded either from a manufacturing defect (non Goodridge) and an insect taking up residence therein.

2. After initial drain, fill and bleed and if after new pads are burnished in, heat the system up using at least 3 panic stops from 80 to 20 MPH

3. Being careful, rebleed the hot system, using the proper bleed technique.
A. Half pressure on the pedal. (you need an assistant). Reapply for each wheel.
B. Use proper sequence ie LF/RF/LR/RR I then reverse sequence RR/LR/RF/LF to double check and be sure.
C. Refill and top off the master reservoir during the procedure. NOTE: You can not properly bleed all four wheels on 1 full reservoir. DO NOT let the reservoir run dry during the bleed procedure.
D. I use a rubber mallet to bang each caliper before and during each bleed. Helps get the air out.

4. Use a good brake fluid with the highest Dry AND Wet Boiling Point you can afford. I personnally think the Wet Point is more important. (I just posted my research on another thread, "Tools required to change brake pads") I personally like AP600.

5. Make sure the fluid is compatable with the car. Far example Castrol SRF is considered to be the best (and most expensive at $70.00/Liter) but is very corrosive and will , I am told eat away the seals in the system. If you use it you will be replacing the master cylinder and possibly the ABS in a season.

6. Do not mix brake fluids. ( I don't care what the label might say about compatability with other fluids.) At the very least you may degrade the Dry and Wet Boiling Points and that's what your paying for. That's why your upgrading the system with new pads @ $300, new lines @ $99, cryo'd rotors @ $135. Why scimp on a $15 pint of fluid?? Makes no sense.

7. On the initial fill and bleed with new fluid, bleed the ABS as well.
The ABS does not drain with the main system and you must use a Tech II analyser/computer to activate it. Your Chevy Dealer or a good brake shop will have one. This puts the correct fluid in the ABS as well and keeps the new fluid from being contaminated when the ABS is activated.

8. Bleed the brakes BEFORE each event and at least AFTER each event. I sometimes try to bleed between runs if I have time and if its a multiple day event at the end of each day.
 

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I was reading on www.corvetteforum.com that folks were having trouble with the Russel SS brake lines and the wheel speed sensors freaking out.
I was unable to find that thread, please post a direct link. I've made a lot of custom brake, oil and fuel system lines over the years (-3 thru -12). I don't understand how this relates to the wheel speed sensors. But I'd really like to know..

But the guys with the Goodridge lines said they didn't have any trouble. I have some Russel SS lines here waiting to go on, but I'm thinking I ought to buy some Goodridges instead. How about it folks, do you have Russel SS lines and no trouble?
I personally would never choose Russel for my brakes. As I understand it, they are a small company and were recently purchased by Edelbrock. From their website, their focus is auto/marine. They may make great products, but I will never find out.

It would be interesting to see how the products offered for this application differ (adapters, strain relief, jacketing, crimp vs. screw on, etc). I prefer to put application specific adaptors at the caliper and the chassis so that a generic line with -3 ends can be used. Keep the C5 specifics on the C5.

I would go with Aeroquip, Earl's or Goodridge. Of the three, Aeroquip does a *huge* amount of business with the aerospace industry.

I just don't see how a small company like Russel can invest as much in QC, R&D, and what basic stuff they can do in house vs. out-source (heat treat, anodizing, hose assembly, etc).


Earl's is not generally an aerospace supplier, but they do supply industry (not sure how much). They formed when the suprlus plumbing market dried up and racers needed an alternative. At that time, I think Aeroquip was enjoying the defense industry build up, and wasn't really doing small sales. I believe Goodridge has a similar background, except that they are not a US company (ahem). I've received excellent tech support from Earl's on my plumbing projects.

All three of these companies supply F1, CART, IRL, TRANS-AM, etc teams. It isn't clear who has the greatest market penetration there, but I don't think that would mean much (given sponsor deals, etc). In particular, the F1 guys are running ultra-light kevlar/sprecra/etc hoses with titanium ends, not stainless. They aren't the hoses your Daddy ran on his Oldsmobile, nor do they have much in common with the hoses you run on your Z06 ;)

Carroll Smith, in his outstanding series of books on race car preparation, has long expressed a preference for Earl's or Aeroquip over anything else.
 

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Goodridge Lines

Goodridge Lines are made in England.
There is a large US Distributor and Warehouse in N.C.
They are made for racing by racers.
Each and every line is tested to 3000psi.
The SS weave is tighter than Russels, Earls, or Aeroquip.
They are made vehicle specific.
They come with all connectors.
They come with all hangers and brackets necessary for that vehicle.

They do make the kevlar lines for F1 and you can purchase them.
Be aware the kevlars are light and strong but are meant for open wheeled cars where there are no body panels or inner fenders to rub against and abrade the lines, especially in a shunt.
 
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