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I've asked a couple of questions on this subject, but still am not totally clear on how to do this. You are supposed to bed the pads in to get maximum performance and life out them, correct? You should also season the rotors for the same purpose, correct?

This is where I'm confused:

If you put overheat the rotors when they are new you can warp them or heat check them and mess them up. Conversely, if you don't get enough heat into the pads, you will also mess the pads up. They tell you to take it easy on the rotors for the first couple hundred miles, but the break in procedure for the pads is quite aggressive. How do you bed the pads in and season the rotors without screwing up one or the other. Usually, you're supposed to bed pads with used rotors or vice versa.

So, what exactly is the procedure when both the pads and rotors are new? :-? :-? :-? :-?
 

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Bump for ya... I also want to know.
 

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z06_23_45 said:
They tell you to take it easy on the rotors for the first couple hundred miles, but the break in procedure for the pads is quite aggressive.
The guidance for rotors is for the average joe who is not going to go out and properly bed in his brakes.

The purpose of bedding rotors is to help put a thin film layer of pad material on them. Heat isn't really an issue you should worry about for the rotors. The purpose of bedding in the pad is to cure the pad material.

Warped rotors is more of a myth than a reality. The issue is more commonly an uneven pad material buildup from improperly bedding in your brakes.
http://www.stoptech.com/whitepapers/warped_rotors_myth.htm

The whole process of bedding in pads is talked about here:
http://www.stoptech.com/whitepapers/bedincontents.htm

I have been braking in rotors this way for years and have only had one problem. That came when I didn't follow the normal procedure and had an uneven pad material transfer which resulted in what feels like a "warped" rotor. I could've had the rotors turned and started over, but as they are only $25 a pop, I just threw them away and bought a new set.
:cheers:
 

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I would go with Subdriver's advice. There is a lot of Techno-babble out here about bedding and seasoning.

If you really want to season rotors properly I recommend just a little salt and olive oil at 400 degrees for about 15 minutes... :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
 

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z06_23_45 said:
I've asked a couple of questions on this subject, but still am not totally clear on how to do this. You are supposed to bed the pads in to get maximum performance and life out them, correct? You should also season the rotors for the same purpose, correct?

This is where I'm confused:

If you put overheat the rotors when they are new you can warp them or heat check them and mess them up. Conversely, if you don't get enough heat into the pads, you will also mess the pads up. They tell you to take it easy on the rotors for the first couple hundred miles, but the break in procedure for the pads is quite aggressive. How do you bed the pads in and season the rotors without screwing up one or the other. Usually, you're supposed to bed pads with used rotors or vice versa.

So, what exactly is the procedure when both the pads and rotors are new? :-? :-? :-? :-?
Call Hal Baer of Baer racing in Arizona and ask for their 6-page instruction manual that comes with their rotors and Alcon systems. If you do not properly break-in the brakes - pun intended - you will likely see shorter pad life and increased chance or warping the rotors. Most of the issues I've seen are from guys who bolted on the brakes and then went for broke. Driving hard on new brakes makes about as much sense as failing to break-in a new motor and running it at redline right off the show room floor...not a smart idea.
 
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