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Can someone explain to me why so many drivers wiggle the steering wheel back and forth while they are in a corner? I see this a lot in DE videos and even professional racing. I dont drive like this and it seems like it would not be the best way to be smooth(Using the idea that smooth = speed). Doesnt this technique just unsettle the car and induce some understeer? What am I missing?
 

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I have an AWD car that responds better in low and medium fast corners under certain circumstances like off camber. The Z06 doesn't need this very much. I don't know if it's faster or not when I do it - but I think it is and so I use it on occasion.
I've seen this debated on other forums and there's no clear cencensus. :-?
 

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Subw00er said:
Can someone explain to me why so many drivers wiggle the steering wheel back and forth while they are in a corner? I see this a lot in DE videos and even professional racing. I dont drive like this and it seems like it would not be the best way to be smooth(Using the idea that smooth = speed). Doesnt this technique just unsettle the car and induce some understeer? What am I missing?
There are a lot of reasons this is done, and in many cases it is because the car has actually developed a push, it's beginning to understeer. Unwinding the wheel a bit and trying to get the front to bite up again, then introducing steering again can help. Basically, you are "looking" for the traction. Or, as stated above, it can be countersteering for an oversteer condition. Bumpy pavement that induces bump steer can cause you to have to work the wheel a little also, like I said, lots of reasons......
 

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Usually when a driver is "wiggling" the steering wheel around the turn then they are at the limit of the tires and the steering input is done to regain traction, either front or rear, without slowing the car down or unsettling it with throttle control.

1) rear has exceeded capacity...counter steer to catch the car from spinning but come back quickly to prevent overcorrection and deadly "tank-slapper".

2) Front tires have exceeded capacity and car is pushing...open steering to widen the radius so tires will regrip and then tighten turn back up having scrubbed some speed so you can make the turn. This is sometimes called "sawing" the turn to stay on the edge of traction.
 

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Another thing you guys aren't mentioning is that the pavement could be bumpy, and the wheel is kicking back. You should be turning the wheel with pressure, and not displacement, and so the kickback will unwind the wheel a bit, but your pressure will put it right back to where it was.

Watch incar footage from an IRL or CART race on the big ovals, you'll see the wheel moving all over the place, but the cars holding a perfect line.
 

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mgarfias said:
Another thing you guys aren't mentioning is that the pavement could be bumpy, and the wheel is kicking back. You should be turning the wheel with pressure, and not displacement, and so the kickback will unwind the wheel a bit, but your pressure will put it right back to where it was.

Watch incar footage from an IRL or CART race on the big ovals, you'll see the wheel moving all over the place, but the cars holding a perfect line.

:yeadog: When the car is near limit you constantly need to be compensating for the smallest little changes. Simply put, if you can corner without any input to the steering wheel, throttle or brakes to balance the car, you are not going as fast as you could be.
However, if you need to be sawing at the
wheel, slamming on the brakes or mashing the throttle, you are off line carrying to much speed or the car is not working like it should be. :z: :cheers:
 
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