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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just ordered my rear Nittos and am reluctant to take the car in to let the tire people remove and put the rims back on for fear of them either jacking the car wrong or breaking the wheel studs.

A Chevy tech broke 2 wheel studs last month while doing rotor warranty work and he supposedly was using a torque wrench. I am to the point I feel safer if I remove them at home myself and take the loose tires in to be done.

Anyone run into techs jacking the Vettes wrong? The rears might be able to just jack the rear end member and not use pucks but im not sure yet.

I never take my other cars in to have tires mounted as the tire techs are...lets say not some of the best experienced people out there. I take them off at home and take them all in loose. The local Chevy dealer recommended one place that does all their tire mounting, but I am still cautious.
 

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I take em off if possible too. I have had the dealer break studs on me as well. Not fun. Especially after you tell them 85lbs, do not use an impact.
 

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Take em off yourself, haul the rims/wheels to the tire dealer and have em installed and then put em on yourself. Thats what I do everytime. Its the only way to guarantee that the lugs are torqued to spec and anti-seize is put on the threads.
JMO

Jim
 

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That's what I would do, take them off yourself & take them to them. I've got a set of wheels ordered and that what I'm going to do also.
 

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mgarfias said:
I take em off if possible too. I have had the dealer break studs on me as well. Not fun. Especially after you tell them 85lbs, do not use an impact.
I haven't had the need to replace tires YET but when I do I will take them off myself and bring them in. I torque mine to 100 ft lbs per factory spec. :yeadog: :yeadog: :yeadog:
 

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Brian,

I see you live in the SF, CA bay area; take your Z to these guys:

Custom Alignment (graphics are not displaying correctly for some reason)

They're located in Mt. View (101, Rengstorff exit). You can order your tires through tirerack.com and have them drop shipped to their store :thumb:

I haven't taken my Z to them yet but I plan to when the time comes. I just took my DD (94 Ford Probe GT) in and these guys did a superb job putting on some new shoes (Firestone Firehawk Wide Ovals :jammin: ). The wheels already have some minor scratches/gouges from past technicians sloppy work but they treated my DD as if it were a new car and did not break or damage anything. I'm extremely pleased with the alignment that they did too (you will pay a tad more with these guys but worth every penny in my opinion!!)

They've done numerous Vettes of all generations along with exotics, matter of fact there were several Porsches there getting work done while I was there.

I live in Fremont but I will continue to use these guys from now on!!!! :cheers:
 

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NavyPhrog said:
Take em off yourself, haul the rims/wheels to the tire dealer and have em installed and then put em on yourself. Thats what I do everytime. Its the only way to guarantee that the lugs are torqued to spec and anti-seize is put on the threads.
JMO

Jim
Yep, I agree :yeadog: :yeadog: :yeadog:
 

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tszwec said:
I haven't had the need to replace tires YET but when I do I will take them off myself and bring them in. I torque mine to 100 ft lbs per factory spec. :yeadog: :yeadog: :yeadog:
100lbs is spec dry. I always lube threads, so 85lbs per ARP (whose studs I have on the car due to dealer breaking them).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What is interesting I know of no dealer or tire place that uses anti sieze on wheel stud threads. It just isnt done for some reason.
 

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Speedratchet said:
I always take the tires and rims off before I take them in.
Cuts down a lot on the aggravation factor.
Me too!
 

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What is interesting I know of no dealer or tire place that uses anti-seize on wheel stud threads. It just isn't done for some reason.
Probably because most or all torque specs are for dry threads. It may be a more consistent way to measure stretch in the bolt/fastener, which is the goal anyway. If you lube it you reduce the torque to get to a specific amount of stretch.

Anti-seize is typically used with steel studs in aluminum to prevent galling especially with thermal cycling. Is anti-seize really necessary or even desirable for wheel studs? GM service manual would say something if it was necessary.
 

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Do not apply "antiseize" to the lug hardware or studs ... Be careful because if you over torque a wheel, you can strip a lug nut, stretch or break a wheel
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have never used anti-seize on anything in my 30 years of working on cars and never had a problem not using it. Even after 25 years on one of my cars I tore into last year every nut and bolt came off without any trouble. Im sure it has its advantages on some applications and some it doesnt.
 

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Specs are for dry torque.
However, we must keep in mind that proper clamp load is the chief concern. The dry torque ratings are determined due to the clamp load requirements. Coatings on the studs/nuts are there to ensure proper/consistent clamping and control corrosion. If you can measure clamp load and determine the proper range of torque required for it, you could decide on your own whether or not anti-sieze is appropriate. However, the methods used to find clamp load require a test rig (unless someone else has come up with another device).

One thing also to note is that after having new tires installed, there is a "chance" that tire lube can drip/run down onto the stud/nut and cone seat of the nut. This causes high clamp loads (bolt stretch)at low torque; therefore studs could break.

So, make sure that everything is dry in the stud/nut/cone seat area before mounting the wheel to the car. (no matter who is working on it)
 

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tszwec said:
I haven't had the need to replace tires YET but when I do I will take them off myself and bring them in. I torque mine to 100 ft lbs per factory spec. :yeadog: :yeadog: :yeadog:
:thumb: and no anti-seize or greese or anything else on Lugs
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I talked to a few Vette techs who torque the wheel nuts to 85 ft/lbs only. They have busted too many at 100 ft/lbs to keep doing them that way.
 
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