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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking into upgrade the brakes on my Z. I do not want to spend the money on a full blown race kit like the Brembo's.

The car might be used in light track work and high performance street stuff.

Any thoughts on these systems:
- SSBC(Stainless Steel Brake Corp) has a 3 piston front kit for $700. http://www.ssbrakes.com/products/detail/2938/?make=Chevrolet&model=Corvette&year=2004
how good is this kit???
They have a 4 piston kit for $1900

-Wilwood has a Billet Superlite 6 Piston kit for about $1900
I assume these a very good-the name is very well know.

I can not find anything in between these kit's, costs.
I have not seen these kit cheaper, anywhere else than listed.

Looking for some advise and assistant.
 

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This one is easy. You want a fixed caliper. The 'three-piston' caliper is still floating. LG has a Wilwood front with the stock rotor. I think it is $1400.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Did not see this one- I just looked- You correct. This is an option.
TY
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What is a good. descent upgrade for the rears.. I assume you can't use the Z06 fronts on the rears
 

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jz06man said:
What is a good. descent upgrade for the rears.. I assume you can't use the Z06 fronts on the rears
You can, but it really won't do much. Fronts do 80%+ of the braking. Get LG's Wilwood kit up front, run good pads all around (i.e. Wilwood H) and you'll be outbraking most anything out there.
 

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You can upgrade the OEM brakes quite easily:

1. Vibrational Stress Relief on the Rotors
2. Cryo the rotors (use a 3 step deep Cryo process with a final Heat Treat)
3. Race Fluid (Motul 600, AP600, Wilwood EXP600, GS610)
4. Goodridge SS Lines with -3AN connectors and shrink wrap sleeves
5. Bleed brakes and ABS with Tech II Analyser on initial purge, flush, fill & bleed
6. DR SS Caliper Pistons OR VB&P F1 Vented Titanium tipped Caliper Pistons
7. Race Pads ( KFP Gold for street /AutoX/DE or PFC '01's for track)
8. Speedbleeders
9. DR Front Brake Duct Extension
10. LG Motorsports Hub Ducts
11. Water Injection Cooling System
12. Bleed often using a rubber mallet & Brake Bleed Bottle
 

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DJWorm said:
You can upgrade the OEM brakes quite easily:

1. Vibrational Stress Relief on the Rotors
2. Cryo the rotors (use a 3 step deep Cryo process with a final Heat Treat)
3. Race Fluid (Motul 600, AP600, Wilwood EXP600, GS610)
4. Goodridge SS Lines with -3AN connectors and shrink wrap sleeves
5. Bleed brakes and ABS with Tech II Analyser on initial purge, flush, fill & bleed
6. DR SS Caliper Pistons OR VB&P F1 Vented Titanium tipped Caliper Pistons
7. Race Pads ( KFP Gold for street /AutoX/DE or PFC '01's for track)
8. Speedbleeders
9. DR Front Brake Duct Extension
10. LG Motorsports Hub Ducts
11. Water Injection Cooling System
12. Bleed often using a rubber mallet & Brake Bleed Bottle
Could you elaborate on:

1. Vibrational Stress Relief on the Rotors...never heard of it. Is this balancing?

2. (use a 3 step deep Cryo process with a final Heat Treat)

3. Water Injection Cooling System

4. Bleed often using a rubber mallet

I disaggree with the speedbleeders. They work 'ok', however I prefer use a small hand vacuum pump (nice brass one from Sears for $50).

Also, you shouldn't be able to use the fronts in the rear. The pistons are way too big, the brake balance will be way off. Typically the rears will have 1/3rd the force or a little less at street car CGs, aero, tires, and this 100+in wb (in my experience).

David
 

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During the formation process (smelting, casting or forging) and in the manufacturing process (machining, welding, grinding, bending, forming & drilling) refined and alloy metals can have stress induced into the structure, usually by heat. These induced stress points are the source of cracks. The cracks you see in rotors do not originate from the heat generated by use on the track but rather from stresses induced in the manufacturing process; forming the rotor, machining the faces and drilling the hub and lug holes. The heat of use only allows these stress defects to grow into visible cracks.

Induced Stress can exsist within a finished metal piece as Thermal and/or Mechanical stress. Both can be and are present at the same time.

The stress defects usually starting at the molecular level can be relieved and dissipated safely using a couple of processes individually or in concert. They include the more standard heat treat process and recently Cryogenic treatment and now VSR.

1. Vibrational Stress Relief uses a sub harmonic inducer to set up a vibration and a transducer to measure the effect. Each metal part vibrates at a certain peak frequency, like a tuning fork, due to the stress present. The Inducer is then used to over power the inert stress frequency and vibrate the part at a frequency lower than peak which relieves the stress in the part. This process is nondestructive, does not induce heat and will not change hardness or structure. Suprisingly it relieves the induced Thermal stress. VSR can be used repeatedly during use of the part.

2. A proper Cryogenic tempering uses preconditioning and then a stepped freezing process followed by a final rewarm and heat treat to "triple temper" the part. A Cryogenic treatment will realign the molecular structure, reduce molecular structure "gaps" and relieve induced Mechanical stress in the part. It also increases the Rockwell Hardness slightly. Cryo is only used on new parts.

3. Used on racing Porshes & Ferraris and on many F1 and Prototype racers; a water injection systym, or better described as a "mister" or "vapor" injector, injects a fine mist of H2O into the brake cooling ducts. This cooling mist, by adding wator vapor to the air flow, will drop the air temp 20-40 degrees depending on ambient and relative humidity present, thus cooling the brakes further. The mist is usuallly actuated by a brake fluid pressure sensor switch upon pedal actuation. It draws H20 from a small reservoir and pumps it thru SS braided lines to misting nozzles in the brake duct. The water is dissolved vapor by the time it reaches the rotors.

4. A "pearl" for brake bleeding is to always bleed each caliper before during and after an event. A key to this is to bleed the system when the fluid is hot AND to use a rubber mallet to rap the calipers while bleeding to disslodge any trapped air.

5. You can dissagree all you want but you are not only disagreeing with me but almost every professional racing team in the US and every F1 team and Prototype team in Europe.
- Power Bleeders and Vacume bleeders should NOT be used to bleed a tracked cars brake system.
- Power Bleeders induce micro air emboli and force dissolved air into solution at the master cylinder interface.
- Vacume bleeders seperate air, pull it out of solution and frequently leave air bubbles at joints, creaveses, bends and at solinoids and valves. The Z06 has 6 Solenoids in the system.
- An automatic computer controlled and pressure measured and pressure limited pressure/vacume bleeder should only be used in a closed loop or fluid recirculating system which the Z06 is NOT.

Using Speedbleeders, bleeding hot and often using a rubber mallet, an assistant to pump the brakes 2-3 times per caliper and a valved catch bottle is quick, easy, effective and neat.
 

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Last time I looked, wilwood's calipers werent setup for street use. They sold them for street, but were lacking things like dust seals that a street driven set needs.
 

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Some use larger brakes in the rear. Some use the 6 piston Wilwoods in the front and then rotate the front OEM to the rear.

There is no problem with brake balance as the Automatic Brake Proportioning System on the Z06 sees the difference and makes about 100 adjustments per second. That is why a different brake proportioning spring is NOT available for the Z06 but is for the C5, which doesn't have the automatic system, and why a Brake Proportioning Adjuster is unecessary on a tracked Z06.

It may be necessary to increase the size of the master cylinder however.
 

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The Wilwood front is approximately the same piston area as stock. Moving the stock caliper to the rear must make the proportioning device work overtime! While that may allow a front caliper to work in the rear, what would be the advantage of doing it?

With those many solenoids in the brake system, the vacuum may not be that affective. On my stock car, it worked very well, removing air that pumping was ineffective on. The mallet work work on any part of the brake system by extrapolation.

However, the speedbleeders rely on that sealant to ensure air doesn't seep in. I have not found them to work to my liking.

Is water misting an effective way of extending Z06 brakes? In a track day car I would have thought a heavier rotor coupled with the ducts would have been the first choice.

Is the 'Vibrational Stress Relief' the Bonal Meta-Lax process? http://www.meta-lax.com/no_flash/PDF/How_Meta-Lax_Works.pdf. Is it widely available? Does anyone else offer it?

Wouldn't changing the molecular structure and molecular spacing (function of the structure) be a better description than reduce molecular structure gaps? It was my understanding that the prolonged period at -300F completes a transition from austenite necessary in some alloys. Brake rotors seem to be a favorite with widely reported favorable results.

David
 

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Back to the original topic, things all this is trying to achieve are:

1. Don't boil the fluid

2. Keep the brake pads in their operating temperature range

3. Maintain a firm and easily modulated pedal with controllable engagement and release characterics.

Item 3 only works after you have items 1 and 2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank for all the feedback, I guess a set of Wilwoods fronts are coming this spring.
 
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