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Discussion Starter #1
My wife's Durango (aka my tow vehicle), squats a lot, doesn't feel good at speed with the open trailer / Z. I put the Z as far back as I could, still not great. Anyone using one of those load leveling devices? I think ive figured out how they work, but I'm comparing that to some kind of helper spring / air shock, etc.

What're your guys thoughts? :usa:
 

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Sounds like you have to much weight on your tongue. To fix that you need to move the wheels on the trailer forward. :cheers:
 

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Check the tongue weight on the trailer loaded. (Do a google search for "tongue weight" to find how to do it with bathroom scales, or for where to buy a tongue weight scale for $100 +/-) If that exceeds the dead weight hitch capacity of your hitch/vehicle combination then buy a good weight distributing hitch. If you have not exceeded the rating, then firestone ride-rite or airlift make air inflatable helper springs (bags) that you can adjust to support up to 1000 pounds that should level you right up. They ride much smoother than air shocks when not needed for support.
 

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P.S. If you get the car too far back on the trailer, you stand a good chance of inducing a very dangerous trailer whip at speed. The tongue weight shoud ideally be a minimum of 10, up to 15% of your total trailer weight. This is all assuming that you do not have a trailer which allows you to move the axles. Mine does not. My tongue wt. scale is from a company called Sherline, comes in 750, 1000, and 1500 lb ratings (mine is 1000), and they have an excellent tutorial on trailering on their website. Also, in reviewing my previous post, I assume that your hitch is already a weight distributing hitch, but you need the attachments that convert it from a dead-weight hitch to a weight distributing hitch. They come in a package that includes the drawbar, springbars (most usually two) chains, and trailer attachments. I'd get the weight rating that exceeds the maximum tongue weight that you ever expect to see.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Ken Martin said:
Also, in reviewing my previous post, I assume that your hitch is already a weight distributing hitch, but you need the attachments that convert it from a dead-weight hitch to a weight distributing hitch.
Ken - thanks for the help, but I don't understand this sentence. I have a regular hitch. I am considering buying the weight distributing setup...
 

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Why do you even need load levelers? I used to tow a 7500 lb boat/trailer combo with my Chevy K1500 w/trailer package. I made sure I had about 5% weight on the tongue (I know that's a little light), and all was fine. No squat, and the trailer stayed dead straight behind the truck.

The vette & trailer should weigh considerably less than the boat. If you don't have the trailer package, perhaps you should consider doing it aftermarket, at least for your tranny. I don't know anything about Dodge's, but perhaps it is asking you for helper springs to mitigate the squat.
 

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99cobra said:
My wife's Durango (aka my tow vehicle), squats a lot, doesn't feel good at speed with the open trailer / Z. I put the Z as far back as I could, still not great. Anyone using one of those load leveling devices? I think ive figured out how they work, but I'm comparing that to some kind of helper spring / air shock, etc.

What're your guys thoughts? :usa:
I had the same problem with my Durango. I fixed it by trading it in on an F350 6.0L Turbo Diesel Crew Cab Long Bed. There may be less expensive options. :lol:

Seriously, good advice above. Tongue weight should be 10-15% of the trailer load. Even though my Durgano was rated for 7250# of towing, it couldn't handle the tongue weight. I personally don't like the torque a load leveling device puts on the hitch and mount and would go with a better rear supsension. I was also looking at the Suburban and would have got the HD version with the air leveling shocks. :cheers:
 

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!. The Ball assembly needs to have the ability to adjust vertically so the trailer can be leveled
2. Load Equalizers such as the simple Trunion Style #7903 in the link above will help transfer some of that weight to the tow vehicle.
3.check the capacity of the tires on the tow vehicle and mind the tire pressure on a regular basis
4.For some realtime help go to your local RV trailer dealer

Happy and Safe Towing :thumb:
 

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Subdriver said:
I was also looking at the Suburban and would have got the HD version with the air leveling shocks. :cheers:
My Tahoe has this, the Autoride setup, and it does really work like a charm!

Personally, I second Subdrivers comments. I would not do a load leveling hitch before I did heavier springs/helper springs or an airbag setup. Focus on the suspension, as it will make it SAFER to drive by being able to handle the load.
 
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