Corvette Z06 Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
891 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Are smooth rotors the best way to go because they have the greatest friction with the pads, or are slotted/dimpled rotors better because they dissipate some heat and gasses?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,143 Posts
I have been very pleased with the Baer Pro+ kit using 14" CD/S/Z Eradispeed Rotors and 4-piston Alcon calipers on the front and 13.5 CD/S/Z Eradispeed Rotors and 4-piston Alcon calipers on the rear with S/S brake lines and Motul high-temp fluid. I run the street pads which work just fine. CD/S/Z = cross-drilled/slotted/zinc treated. Its not only good for DE its great for hauling my ass down from well into the triple digits in a hurry.... :cheers:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
809 Posts
Bob said:
Are smooth rotors the best way to go because they have the greatest friction with the pads, or are slotted/dimpled rotors better because they dissipate some heat and gasses?
Slotted and/or dimpled rotors would be better because they will release some of the gasses that can build up and keep the pad from making the most contact with the rotor. It's just a matter of cost.

Try and stay away from drilled rotors though because they have a tendency to crack.

Sal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts
For DE's I recommend an upgraded OEM brake system which can include the following improvements:

Rotors:
- OEM or good OEM replacement rotors that have been
- Cryogenically treated, thermal & mechanical stress relieved.
- Slotting Optional.
- Internal Vane deburring and stress risers removed Optional
- Heat Barrier Coating on Hub Flange Optional
- Heat Emitter Coating on vanes Optional

Calipers with:
- DR SS Caliper Pistons OR
- VB&P F1 Vented & Titanium Tipped Caliper Pistons
- Micro polished and Anodized Caliper Piston Bores Optional
- Heat Barrier Coating on Piston Face Optional
- Heat Barrier Coating on Internal Caliper Surfaces Optional

Racing Pads:
KFP Carbon/Kevlar Gold Magnum Racing Pads with ceramic backing plates built in.

Racing Fluid:
- Either Motul 600, AP 600, Wilwood EXP or GS610
(On initial purge, drain, flush & refill Tech II Analyser MUST be used to purge and bleed the ABS system)

Install Speedbleeders

Install Goodridge SS Braided Lines with -3AN Connectors
(Don't use Banjo Connectors)

Cooling:
- DR Brake Duct Extensions AND
- LG Motorsports Spindel/Hub Duct
- Seine Systems MPC water injection system Optional

Bleed brakes often using:
- Pegasus Brake Bleed Catch Bottle
- Rubber mallet to tap calipers when bleeding Hot.

Proper bed and season pads & Rotors.

Properly warm up and cool off brakes before & after each session
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,817 Posts
DJWorm aught to get some "Z miles" for all his great posts and contributions. Come on JC, loosen up a little. :thumb:

Bob
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,625 Posts
Bob said:
Are smooth rotors the best way to go because they have the greatest friction with the pads, or are slotted/dimpled rotors better because they dissipate some heat and gasses?
How far do you want to go Bob?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
891 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
MSiska said:
How far do you want to go Bob?
I am trying to have a good DE car that can be returned to stock without too much difficulty. If I did everything that DJ suggests, it would break the bank! I have taken DJ's excellent advice on many brake items, but my budget is a limiting factor. I was wondering which rotor surface gave the best stopping power and I think inexpensive smooth rotors are probably the best for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,625 Posts
Bob said:
I am trying to have a good DE car that can be returned to stock without too much difficulty. If I did everything that DJ suggests, it would break the bank! I have taken DJ's excellent advice on many brake items, but my budget is a limiting factor. I was wondering which rotor surface gave the best stopping power and I think inexpensive smooth rotors are probably the best for me.
I found through the seven DE's I have attended that the rotors are cheap enough to replace even after one event. I replaced the rotors after three events (maybe I wasn't driving hard enough...ask Steve Row about that...:D ). Bought them for $25.00 apiece and used Hawk HP+ pads. I also had Goodridge SS lines. And used Super Blue brake fluid. Changed the fluid out after every two events. With this set up, I was able to carry my speed deep into the corners, then honk on the brakes, hit the apex and then apply throttle. The Hawk pads screamed like you were dragging a cat behind you when braking on the street. But on the track when they got heated up....they were Da Bomb!! No fade and great braking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Don't waste your money on a ton of crap...well, actually it's not crap, it's just expensive stuff you don't really need.

Don't worry about cryo'ing rotors or cross drilling or slotting or any of that. Just use a really good pad with good calipers and good fluid and lines.

You've done virtually everything right so far. The only thing I'd recommend is that you try the Carbotech Pads. I use XP11s up front and 10s in the back. You can run these on the street too. These are racing pads that are unreal, so you may consider going a bit less agressive...possibly the 10/9 combo or maybe even 9/8 combo. All these will work great.

Go to Rockauto.com and buy lots of cheap rotors and keep them on hand...and run them til they crack. Once they crack though, trash them and put on new stuff. Any time you slot or drill or dimple rotors, you take away brake surface area. The reason for slotting, etc. long ago was to release gas buildup between the pad and rotor. Today's pads are so good, you don't need that. It looks cool, but will just wear your pads faster and won't stop you any faster. I've experimented with a bunch of combos over the years and I just run the stock stuff now.

I use the Motul 600 fluid and it's awesome. I also use the Goodridge lines.

The last part to check is/are the calipers. I'd recommend you replace them once a year. You can get them for about $105 each. The problem is that they spread over time and cause some brake wear abnormalities. Running in T1, I replace the front twice a year and the rears once a year. When the top of the pads start to wear more than the rest, it's time to replace the caliper.

Do all that and save your extra money for more DE events. Keep learning the car and learning to drive and put the extra $$$ in the bank for more tires and brakes. If you decide to go into racing into a catagory like GT1 or something like that, then modify the hell out of your car. Until then, enjoy it as stock and drive the piss out of it!!!!

The bottom line to all of this though is the old saying: "Speed cost money, how fast do you want to go?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,065 Posts
NAPA rotors are OK just check them for cracks after every session. Check them again AFTER they cool. They also crack as they cool. Make sure to check them behind the wheels of the spokes and leave none unchecked. We all get lazy. I get mine red hot. I run the cooling ducts and Wilwood H compound. They rotors show little wear but will crack then split. 100 for four buy them like Livesavers and toss them. Getting some temperature is also hlpful before you take them to the track. Heat them on the street with some repeated stops. Close your brake ducts with tape so you don't go wild on the street. Let them cool over night. That will prevent them from thermal shock. Don't bother buying chesse graters.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
809 Posts
If you're just getting into doing DE's, I'd seriously consider just doing a fluid flush and go have fun. The stock DOT3 fluid will boil and you'll have mush for brakes by the end of the DE.

The pads should be ok though unless you are super agressive with them. You just won't be able to run as hard. If you see any fade, you'll just have to lay off until they cool a bit.

Sal
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top